Posts in Plant Care
How to Care for and Grow Your Monstera Deliciosa

Monstera Deliciosa

AKA philodendron split-leaf

How to care for and grow the Monstera Deliciosa

This stylish and iconic plant from the art deco era has made a comeback in a big way and is more popular than ever. Learn the basics of Monstera plant care including light requirements, watering frequency, and how to troubleshoot common problems you may encounter along the way.

Light

Monsteras prefer bright indirect light, though they can adjust to medium levels of light. Keep them out of harsh direct sunlight, as too much of it can scorch their leaves!

Water

Let your Monstera dry out between waterings. Water thoroughly when topsoil is dry, usually once a week. Avoid overwatering, and note that your watering schedule may be less frequent during winter months.

Growth

In prime conditions, the Monstera is an incredibly fast grower and can grow up to 10 feet tall indoors. Most growth occurs during spring and summer.

Common problems with Monsteras

Monstera yellow leaves

Leaves turning yellow, brown, or black

If you see yellow or brown leaves on your Monstera, you may be overwatering. This could also be an issue of too much water and not enough light — make sure your plant is getting the right ratio of each!

Before you diagnose, rest assured that you can remove any yellow or brown leaves by simply cutting them off at the base. Then, check the soil, and if it’s wet to the touch (particularly at the bottom), then let it dry out completely before watering again. Overwatering can lead to more severe ailments and that may eventually require you change the soil.  


Leaves curling

If the leaves of your Monstera are curling, your plant is most likely under-watered. You can easily fix this issue by giving your plant a thorough “shower” — take it out of its decorative pot and place it outside or in a bathtub. Give it plenty of water and let it drain out completely before putting it back in its pot. Another method is to let it sit in water for a few hours, giving the roots a chance to drink up!

Leaves wilting or drooping

If your Monstera looks droopy or the leaves are wilting, this could be one of two things — overwatering, or under-watering! Easy, right? Check the soil (always check the soil!). If it’s bone dry, follow the instructions above to give it a good shower. If it’s moist, you most likely overwatered it and should wait until it’s dried out before watering again. During this time, make sure it’s getting enough light (bright indirect is ideal) so that it can dry out properly. A little extra airflow never hurt either!

Monstera no holes on leaves

No holes on the leaves

Have a monstera with no holes on the leaves? No problem! No holes or splits on the leaves of Monsteras is not always a sign of distress. If your plant is young, rest assured that sometimes it’s not until the plant has unfurled six or seven leaves that the splits start to show up. Alternatively, your plant may not be getting enough light. If you suspect this is the case, move it to an area with more bright indirect light and wait!

 

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Monstera Deliciosa

How to stake a monstera

Take care of your Monstera and it will take care of you! Below are simple tips to continue caring for your Monstera over time.

  • Pruning - Remove dry or dead leaves all year round, but save any major pruning for the spring and summer months. When pruning your Monstera, use sharp, clean shears and cut any excessive growth at the base of the stem.

  • Cleaning - Take each leaf between two soft tissue cloths and wipe off the top to reveal a healthy shine (also helps the plant soak in more light!).

  • Repotting - Houseplants grow much slower than they would in the wild. Depending on the size of your plant and the density of the roots, this is nice to do every 2-3 years to provide fresh nutrients and encourage new growth.

    • When to repot - Monsteras are known for their aerial roots, and it’s not uncommon to see them outside of the soil. However, the plant will show you it’s ready for a bigger pot when the time comes, as the larger stems, and their roots, will literally begin to climb out of the pot.

    • Pot sizing - if you want your plant to grow taller, find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot. If you want your plant to stay the same height, you can reuse the same pot and simply change the soil.

    • Get your hands dirty - spread out newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil and pat down firmly. Water the soil thoroughly and place the plant in an area with bright indirect light. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

  • Staking - Some Monstera owners like to stake their plant not only for aesthetic purposes but also to support the plant and help it grow more vertically. You can do this by simply inserting a moss totem and attaching the stems of the plant to it with prongs.

 

How to propagate a Monstera Deliciosa

Whether you want to recycle your Monstera cuttings or you simply want to create a new plant, know that the Monstera, thanks to its aerial roots, is one of the easiest plants to propagat. Though there are many ways to do this, water propagation is generally the easiest way to go about it. Follow these instructions to propagate your Monstera Deliciosa:

  • Select a stem to propagate - Using sharp, clean scissors or shears, cut an inch or two below an aerial root. You don’t have to propagate with an aerial root, but this is a guaranteed way of propagation success!

  • Place in water - Find a clear glass and fill with water. Make sure only the stem is submerged, and no leaves are sitting in the water.

  • Place in a bright area and wait! - Avoid any direct sun. You may need to change the water out every few days to keep it fresh. It usually takes just a few days for the root to start growing.

  • Transfer to soil - After a week or so, transfer to indoor potting soil. A small pot is best — no larger than 6” in diameter.

  • Keep hydrated - During the first few weeks, or until your plant feels firmly rooted in its soil, regularly water and drain your Monstera. The soil should be just barely moist to the touch at all times.


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Spider Webs and Mites on Houseplants
Photo credit:  reddit

Photo credit: reddit

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Checked your plant's fronds lately? Asides from watering, dusting and checking for insects from time to time should be part of maintaining your plant's health. Check the undersides of leaves and all the stems. If you spot any thin silky webs, it's likely that a few spider mites have decided to take up residency. Treat the problem ASAP to prevent it from spreading.  

  • Clean off your plant with a sturdy stream of cold water in your sink, shower, or outdoors with a hose. Thoroughly spray the tops and bottoms of leaves and stems to completely wash away all webs, mites, and eggs.

  • Let your plant dry off, then treat the infested areas with a natural pesticide like Neem Oil

  • Repeat this process once a week for three weeks to make sure the mites don't come back

Spider mites appear when conditions are hot and dry. If this is a regular issue for you, try adding humidity and air circulation to your plant's environment. These pesky critters essentially feed on your plants, draw out their nutrients needed to survive, and cause leaves to drop until the plant eventually dies. Luckily, they're easy to control if caught early!


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JUNIOR FIDDLE LEAF FIG BUSH

A lush and sculptural plant with elegant violin-shaped leaves, the Junior Fiddle Leaf Fig Bush makes for a dramatic addition to any indoor space – truly a must-have for all who appreciate style and greenery.

3-4ft tall plant with ceramic pot and reclaimed wood stand: $299

How to Prevent and Fix Root Rot
How to fix root rot indoor plants

Have you ever dealt with an ugly case of root rot?

Root rot is a common issue with potted plants, and one that’s fairly easy to avoid by simply following a few basic rules of watering and drainage. And if it’s too late? Fret not! There may still be time to save your plant. Below are tips on how to prevent root rot in the first place, and how to fix root rot once it’s too late.

What is root rot?

Root rot is exactly what it sounds like — the rotting of a plant’s roots — and is the consequence of too much watering and/or not enough drainage. Though it can occur in outdoor plants, it is much more common with indoor greenery and can lead to the quick demise of your plant.

How can I prevent root rot?

Preventing root rot is simple. It’s all about watering and drainage. Follow these simple rules and you will never see root rot in your plants.

  • Give your plant proper drainage - Make sure your plant is potted in something with drainage hole(s), either a plastic nursery pot or a decorative pot that has a drainage hole. If your decorative pot does not have a drainage hole, simply leave the plant in its plastic pot and place it inside the decorative pot.

  • Keep a regular watering schedule - Most plants appreciate regular watering schedules. Sporadic watering is a quick way to hurt your plant as it often means the plant does not have time to dry out at all between waterings (thus leading to root rot)

  • Check the soil - If you don’t do this already, always check the soil of your plant before watering. Most plants like to dry out a bit, so depending on the plant you have, you may want to hold off on watering until the top two inches of the soil is dry.

  • Aerate the soil - Aerating the soil helps loosen it up, allowing for a more even distribution of water and better flow of oxygen, preventing moisture build up in the roots of your plant.

A sure sign of root rot, particularly in the popular Fiddle Leaf Fig plant, is browning on the edges of the leaves. Read more on how to fix root rot on Fiddle Leaf Figs  here .

A sure sign of root rot, particularly in the popular Fiddle Leaf Fig plant, is browning on the edges of the leaves. Read more on how to fix root rot on Fiddle Leaf Figs here.

Help! How do I fix root rot?

If your plant has root rot and you catch it early on, you may be able to save it by acting fast. Follow these steps to fix root rot in most common houseplants.

  • Diagnose the issue - If your plant has been dropping leaves, yellowing, or getting soft, mushy leaves, you may have root rot. Remove the plant from its pot and inspect the roots. If they are soft, wet, brown, and/or mushy, it’s time to roll up your sleeves and treat the roots.

  • Clean the roots - Once your plant is out of its pot, carefully remove as much soil as possible and cut the affected roots off with clean shears or scissors. Under running water, gently wash the remaining roots clean of any soil.

  • Repot - In a pot with proper drainage, repot your plant using fresh soil (and if you’re using the same pot, make sure to clean it thoroughly first!). If it was a serious case and you removed many roots, you may also prune the top of the plant a bit so the plant has less leaves to send its energy to.

  • Place in a bright spot - Water only when the top of the soil is dry. After a few weeks, your plant should take root and return to the healthy specimen it once was!

Good luck, don’t panic, and remember — the more in touch you are with your plants, the more likely they are to thrive. Water them regularly, watch for issues, and enjoy the many benefits they bring to your physical and mental health!

Are you a Léon & George customer and need additional help? Remember that you have access to our virtual plant doctor for any plant care needs!

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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

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How to Revive Droopy Plants
Before and after of Pothos being watered

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Noticed our plant’s leaves and vines looking extra droopy? Your plant is thirsty! Here's how to get it looking perky and happy within hours.

  • Remove plant from its decorative planter and submerge the bottom of the nursery pot in a bucket filled with 2 inches of water.

  • Leave the plant for a few hours to soak up the water

  • Within 2 to 24 hours, come back and see your plant lush and full of life!

This technique works for plants of all types including Fiddles, Calatheas, Peace Lilies, Rubber Trees, Pothos and more. Try it!


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CASCADING POTHOS

An easy-care planta with smooth and leathery heart-shaped leaves.

1 ½ft tall with ceramic & wood stand: $139

Tips for keeping your plants alive when you travel
Desert Cactus by Léon & George

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

It's summertime and for most of us, that means one thing: vacation season! Before you head out the door for your favorite warm-weather getaway, complete this simple checklist to ensure your plants will be alive and thriving when you get home!

  • Water before leaving - the day before you leave, give your plants a full watering and even let them sit in a bit of water for a couple of hours. Make sure all water has drained and plants are returned to their decorative pots before you hit the road.

  • Climate control - most indoor plants prefer to live in temperatures somewhere between 65º-75ºF, so set your temperature controls within that range to ensure your plants won't get too hot or cold.

  • Maintain humidity - to avoid those crispy edges and help humidity last longer, give your plants a good misting before leaving and group multiple plants so together they can produce and maintain humidity in the air.

  • Self watering adapter - If you're going to be gone longer than a few days, we recommend getting a self-watering adaptor. Depending on the size of your plant, these can maintain water for up to a few weeks. They're cheap to buy and easy to make.

For travel longer than 3 weeks, ask a friend to stop by. Plants are living beings and need love and attention just like us and our pets!

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DESERT CACTUS

A sun loving statement plant that’s low maintenance and makes a great conversation piece.

Light Requirements for Plants: Explained!
Artist  @kail_bales

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Understanding light levels, let alone the varying light needs for each type of plant can be tricky. So we made you a light guide! Double check the lighting needs for your type of plant and make sure they're getting their balanced dosage of vitamin D.

  • Direct Light - the light that comes in through west or southern-facing windows, the most intense light for your indoors and will expose plants here directly to the sun's rays. (Works for: cactus and succulents)

  • Bright Light - not really direct light, but definitely not medium light, the spots right night to a window that receives a dash of direct light (no more than an hour a day) before being obstructed. Works for: all plants living indoors would be happy here, here’s our recommended list.

  • Medium Light - the spots in a room that are half the distance between a window and back wall. Still plenty bright, but nowhere near direct. Works for: palms, dracaenas, philodendrons, see all medium light plants here.

  • Low Light - areas that are 7ft or more from windows, or places that have no natural light. Certain plant species are adaptable and can live here, but will grow much slower. If your plant starts to look sad, consider moving it to medium light. Here are plants that do well in low light areas.

Plants can also be "conditioned" to different light levels, but be careful to do this over a period of a few weeks. A sudden shift in light levels will cause your plant to go through shock. More on this another week!

How to Care for and Grow Your Bird of Paradise

The Bird of Paradise

AKA strelitzia nicolai

With enormous glossy leaves and lush jungle vibes, the Bird of Paradise or Strelitzia nicolai is a true head-turner when brought indoors. Named after its colorful flower which resembles a bird in flight, this stylish yet hardy plant is perfect for plant novices and experts alike. Read on for simple tips on how to care for your Bird of Paradise and enjoy years and years of growth.

Light

Water

  • Water thoroughly when topsoil is dry, usually once a week. Avoid overwatering.

  • Watering schedule may be less frequent during winter months

Growth

  • In prime conditions, the Bird of Paradise is a fast grower and can grow up to 10 feet tall indoors

  • As these are such fast growers, fertilize once every two weeks in spring and summer

Common problems with Birds of Paradise

Leaves splitting on a Bird of Paradise — it’s normal!

Leaves splitting

A lot of people worry that the splits in the leaves of birds of paradise are a sign of something wrong, but the truth is that split leaves in this plant are completely normal. As part of nature's design, the splits allow wind to pass through the leaves without bending, breaking, or uprooting the top heavy plant. While splitting may be reduced by keeping the plant indoors, it is still common and completely normal for this to occur.




Brown leaves on Bird of Paradise

Brown edges - underwatering

If you see crispy, brown edges on your Bird of Paradise, it could be that it’s underwatered or the environment is too dry. Birds of Paradise like a lot of humidity and are generally pretty thirsty plants — do not place this plant near air vents or heaters. Make sure you are watering your plant regularly, and also add misting to your routine to boost humidity levels for the plant’s foliage (you can mist every day, several times a day, or just a couple times a week!).

Yellow leaves - overwatering

If you see yellowing wilted leaves on your Bird of Paradise, it could be that your plant is overwatered. Check the roots to make sure there is no root rot. If the roots are damaged, you will need to repot your plant (see below). If the roots are fine, simply let the plant dry out before watering again.

Curling leaves

If the leaves on your Bird of Paradise are curling inward, the cause is most likely also underwatering. To let your plant replenish its moisture, give it a good shower. Remove the plant from its decorative pot and place in a shower, bathtub, or outside. Give it a thorough watering, allowing it to drain all the excess out before putting back in the pot. Depending on how dry the plant is, you may also allow it to sit in water for an hour or two.

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Bird of Paradise

Take care of your Bird of Paradise and it will take care of you! Below are simple tips to continue caring for your Bird of Paradise over time.

How to prune a Bird of Paradise
  • Pruning - This plant does not mind an occasional haircut. With clean shears, cut off older or less attractive stalks at the base. Your plant will have more energy for new growth!

  • Cleaning - Take each leaf between two soft tissue cloths and wipe off the top to reveal a healthy shine (also helps the plant soak in more light!).

  • Trimming & reshaping - Have some leaves that are perfectly healthy but have a few cosmetic damages? Simply trim the leaf to imitate its natural shape. You also may notice your bird of paradise’s leaves occasionally split. This is completely natural and not much you can do about it. Obviously, the more this plant is touched, bumped into, moved, etc, the more the leaves will split.

  • Repotting - Houseplants grow much slower than they would in the wild. Depending on the size of your plant and the density of the roots, this is nice to do every 2-3 years to provide fresh nutrients and encourage new growth.

    • When to repot - if the roots start to become visible outside the soil, it is time to consider repotting your Bird of Paradise

    • Pot sizing - if you want your plant to grow taller, find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot. If you want your plant to stay the same height, you can reuse the same pot and simply change the soil.

    • Get your hands dirty - spread out newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil and pat down firmly. Water the soil thoroughly and place the plant in an area with bright indirect light. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

 

How to propagate a Bird of Paradise

Propagating a Bird of Paradise is best done through division. That said, because Birds of Paradise like to have their roots tightly packed, it is best to only propagate from a plant that has a lot to spare or has outgrown its pot.

  • Spread a newspaper on the floor and remove the plant from its pot - You should see a giant mass of roots!

  • Determine which pieces of the plant you will divide - Carefully begin to separate or untangle the roots. If you need to cut, use clean shears.

  • Repot in fresh soil - Once you have your divided pieces, repot in fresh soil, pack down tightly, and water thoroughly. You’re done!


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Bird of Paradise

Vibrant, lush, and easy to care for, the Bird of Paradise is a popular choice houseplant with wide foliage and a tropical feel.

The Best Plants for Your Bedroom
The best plants for your bedroom.

Looking for the perfect houseplant for your bedroom?

It’s simple. Bedrooms are meant to be peaceful sanctuaries where we go to rest and recharge, but unfortunately our environments are not always conducive to doing so. Not only do indoor plants have a long list of mental health benefits (such as reducing stress), but many also aide in cleaning the air and filtering out harmful toxins often produced by carpet, paint, and other invisible elements of our homes. When choosing plants for your bedroom, go for greenery that’s not only great at purifying your air but also something you will enjoy waking up to each day. Read on to find our picks for the best plants for your bedroom!

The Snake Plant

Voted by Nasa as one of the best air-purifying plants, the Snake Plant is an excellent choice for the bedroom for one main reason: it emits oxygen at nighttime, meaning a better and sounder sleep.

Pro Tip: There are many varieties of Snake Plants, but the yellow variegated type (Laurentii variety) wins in terms of air-purifying power.

The Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree

Looking for a tall plant for your bedroom? It’s no wonder that this structural beauty is the current it plant: the Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree is a true head-turner that will bring life and color into any bedroom.

Pro Tip: This plant can be picky. Check our blog for a wealth of resources on how to take care of this beauty.

 

The Peace Lily

Is there anything more peaceful and calm-inducing than the Peace Lily? This plant makes an excellent low-maintenance bedroom plant that looks great on the floor, a shelf, or near a window.

Pro Tip: Read our full care guide for the Peace Lily.

The Parlor Palm

Palms in general are known for their air-purifing qualities, and the Parlor Palm is no exception. This adorable plant comes in a variety of sizes and will bring instant jungle vibes to your bedroom.

Pro Tip: If you have the space, take things to the next level with the Parlor Palm’s cousin, the extra large Kentia Palm.

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How to Care for and Grow Your Euphorbia Ammak
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The Desert Cactus

AKA euphorbia ammak

The Desert Cactus (or in scientific terms, the Euphorbia Ammak) is a tree-like succulent that thrives with just a bit of water and lots of sunlight. Sometimes referred to as the African Candelabra, the Desert Cactus hails from Saudi Arabia and Yemen and is known for its structural beauty and its ribbed arms edged with spines. Though this plant prefers full sun, it may also flourish in bright indoor conditions, and will undoubtedly elevate any space with its eye-capturing beauty. Read on for simple tips on how to care for the Desert Cactus.

Light

Water

  • Water sparingly once every two weeks in the summer, and once a month for the rest of the year. Avoid overwatering

Growth

  • In prime conditions, the Desert Cactus is a fast grower and can grow to over 8 feet tall indoors

  • Fertilize lightly (half a dose) once a month in the summer

Common problems with the Desert Cactus

Brown patches or scars - sunburn

  • Symptom - rough, localized “scabs” or brown patches

  • Cause - too much sun (yes, this plant can burn!) due to harsh climatic changes (i.e. the plant was grown in a greenhouse with indirect light, then placed in full sun).

  • Remedy - This is simply a scar and though it is not contagious or will spread, there is nothing you can do about its appearance. By the time your plant is burned, it will already have acclimated to its new environment.

Soft brown areas - overwatering

  • Symptom - Mushy or soft brown areas

  • Cause - Too much water or root root

  • Remedy - Check the roots. If the roots are damaged (wet, slimy, etc), you will need to repot your plant (see below for instructions). If they are not damaged, simply hold off on watering until the bottom of the soil completely dries out.

Powdery mildew disease

  • Symptom - Coat of white power on and around ribs

  • Cause - caused by a fungus

  • Remedy - Test out a commercial fungal control on a small area of the plant before treating the entire plant.

 
How to care for euphorbia ammak desert cactus

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Desert Cactus

Take care of your Desert Cactus and it will take care of you! Below are simple tips to continue caring for your Desert Cactus over time.

  • Pruning - The Desert Cactus can often grow very tall with many arms, resulting in a “top-heavy” plant that could potentially topple over. If this is the case, time to prune! Follow the first step in propagation (listed below) to safely prune your cactus.

  • Cleaning - With a damp cloth, gently clean between the ribs once a month to remove any collected dust. Alternatively, you may use a small hand broom to brush off dust.

  • Repotting - Depending on the size of your Desert Cactus, you may need to repot it to ensure it has a big enough base to support the weight of the plant.

    • When to repot - When the cactus has grown substantially and no longer stands straight in its pot. You may also consider pruning instead of attempting to repot.

    • Pot sizing - Find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot.

    • Get your hands dirty - spread out newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil (be sure to use cactus and succulent potting mix!) and pat down firmly. You may need to use a stake to support the weight of your cactus until it fully roots. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

 

How to propagate the Desert Cactus

Whether your Desert Cactus needs a trim, or you’d like to create new plants, propagating the Desert Cactus is relatively simple (though should be approached with care!). The best way to propagate the Desert Cactus is by using cuttings.

  • Prepare for cutting - The safest way to cut your cactus is to lay it down horizontally if possible, and use a sharp, clean, serrated knife. This plant can have a sticky sap that can irritate skin and eyes when cut open so make sure to also wear gloves, protect your arms with long sleeves, and also wear protective eyewear. If you are unable to lay the cactus down, you can also achieve the same results with a few extra hands: one person holds while the other cuts.

  • Determine where you will make the cut - If you’re going to cut your cactus, you should generally cut where the “arm” or branch begins.

  • Rinse and allow to dry - rinse the cutting with cool water and allow to dry.

  • Transfer to soil - Once your cactus cutting(s) are dry, place it in fresh soil and put in a warm, dry place. Do not move the plant for at least six weeks -- it will take some time to root and until then, it is very fragile.


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Desert Cactus

Easy to care for, the structural Desert Cactus is a head-turner with angular edges and yellow-green patterns.

Summer Plant Care Tips: Five Ways To Help Your Plants Thrive This Summer
Summer plant care tips

Did you know your summer plant care routine can be vastly different than in the winter?

Many plants enter major growth phases during the the long, sunny days of summer, but it isn’t always a breeze. Heat waves, harsh sunlight, and excessive air conditioning are just a few things that most houseplants dislike, and making some seasonable adjustments may be necessary to keep them happy and thriving. Read on for a few simple summer care tips for your indoor plants!

Avoid sunburn

The  Bird of Paradise  does not mind plenty of direct sunlight, but this is not the case for most indoor plants!

The Bird of Paradise does not mind plenty of direct sunlight, but this is not the case for most indoor plants!

Some plants that are perfectly happy in their usual spot may not be as happy during the summer. Strong afternoon sun, for example, can be incredibly harsh for many houseplants, and moving them to a shadier area may drastically improve their appearance. Notice droopy, curling, or burned leaves? May be time to adjust!

Keep up the humidity

Many indoor plants thrive with a decent amount of humidity and things like dry summers, heat waves, or air conditioning may reduce the amount of humidity in your home. Make sure your plant is not in the direct path of any air vents, and mist your plants regularly. If things are really dry, you may consider using a humidifier.

Adjust your watering schedule

Some plants can be extra thirsty during the summer. Make sure to check in with your plants and adjust your watering schedule if needed. Plants like calatheas or ferns dry out much faster when it’s warm out, so you may need to water more often than you normally do during other times of the year. Similarly, add regular misting to your plant care routine to boost humidity levels on your plants foliage.

Mist your plants regularly in the summer to boost humidity during heat waves or when running air conditioning!

Mist your plants regularly in the summer to boost humidity during heat waves or when running air conditioning!

Water deeply

If your plants are extra thirsty, consider giving them a good shower. Take them outside or put them in the bathtub or shower and let the water run. You may even leave your plant for a few hours in water for the roots to drink before draining and returning to its home.

Prep for vacation

Going out of town? No worries. Plan to water your plants deeply just before leaving — they will be okay for a week or two like this. If you will be gone for over two weeks, you may like to have a friend stop by to water them. And if you travel a lot but still want a bit of greenery at home, consider plants like the Snake Plant or Zanzibar Gem, two plants that are incredibly drought resistant and don’t mind going several weeks without water! Read our full post on how to prep your plants for vacation (and what to do when you get back!).

As always, remember that your plants are living creatures that do in fact communicate with you! Stay in tune with them and their needs and learn to recognize stress when you see it. The earlier you catch something, the easier it will be to fix.

 

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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

Premium plants paired with stylish ceramics. Order online at leonandgeorge.com

Air Condition Alert
N’Joy Pothos

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

While ACs so pleasantly cool down our indoor spaces, they also remove warmth and humidity that our plant children need and crave. Most indoor plants prefer temperatures between 65-75ºF, any extremes above or below can affect your plant's happiness and health. Follow these easy steps to keep your plants happy and healthy all summer long!

  • Air drafts - check for chilly air blowing directly on your plant. Consider temporarily moving your plant to a new spot or another room to protect it from the drastic changes in temperature.

  • Humidity - offset the dry air created by air conditioners and bring some humidity back to your plant by regularly misting its leaves when the air feels dry.

  • Watering - dry air also causes your plants to be thirsty and drink more water. Check the soil more frequently for potential changes in its watering schedule.

Look out for fading or wilting leaves as this may be a sign of a plant's unhappiness with its conditions. You can safely remove these leaves by clipping them close to the root, and follow the steps above to re-balance its comfort.

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N'JOY POTHOS

Easy breezy with mint and cream colored leaves.

How to Care for and Grow Your Bird's Nest Fern

The Bird’s Nest Fern

AKA asplenium nidus

The gorgeous Bird’s Nest Fern, whose name comes from the nest-like center of the plant, is not your typical fern. Hardier than most of its kind, the Bird’s Nest Fern boasts thick, waxy leaves that slowly unfurl to create a beautiful and unique accent on a table, shelf, or bedroom dresser. But though it trumps most other ferns in terms of maintenance, it is still unforgiving to things like too much sun or an inconsistent watering schedule. Read on to find simple tips on how to care for and grow your Bird’s Nest Fern.

Light

Water

  • Keep the soil evenly moist, never allowing it to completely dry out

  • Water around the edge of the pot and never in the center of its “nest”

Growth

  • In prime conditions, the Bird’s Nest Fern will unfurl new leaves regularly from the center of its “nest”

  • Fertilize once a month during spring and summer

Common problems with Bird’s Nest Fern

Pale leaves - too much light

  • Symptom - pale, yellowish leaves

  • Cause - too much light

  • Remedy - Bird’s Nest Ferns do best with medium indirect light — avoid putting the plant in a place where it is exposed to too much light or direct sunlight.

Brown edges - underwatering, too cold or too dry

  • Symptom - leaves turning brown at the edges

  • Cause - most likely underwatering, but could also be that the temperature is too cold or the air is too dry

  • Remedy - Be sure to keep a consistent watering schedule to ensure the plant’s soil is just moist to the touch. You may also mist the plant weekly to boost moisture levels, and make sure it is not placed near any air vents, heaters, or air conditioners.

Yellow and/or wilting leaves - overwatering

  • Symptom - yellowing or wilting leaves

  • Cause - overwatering

  • Remedy - Unless a very minor case of overwatering, you will most likely need to repot your plant to avoid root rot. See instructions below on how to repot a Bird’s Nest Fern.

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Bird’s Nest Fern

Take care of your Bird’s Nest Fern and it will take care of you! Below are simple tips to continue caring for and growing your Bird’s Nest Fern over time.

  • Pruning - The birds nest fern does not need much pruning, though it is normal for lower leaves to grow old and scraggly, in which case you can remove them at the base with sharp, clean pruning shears.

  • Cleaning - Take each leaf between two soft tissue cloths and wipe off the top to reveal a healthy shine (also helps the plant soak in more light!).

  • Repotting - Ferns generally do not become rootbound, but if the plant is looking unstable or that it might “fall out” of its pot, consider repotting into something slightly bigger with fresh soil.

  • Repotting - Houseplants grow much slower than they would in the wild. Depending on the size of your plant and the density of the roots, this is nice to do every 2-3 years to provide fresh nutrients and encourage new growth.

    • When to repot - if or when the plant looks unstable in its soil, it is time to repot

    • Pot sizing - if you want your plant to grow taller, find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot.

    • Get your hands dirty - spread out newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil and pat down firmly. Water the soil thoroughly and place the plant in an area with bright indirect light. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

How to propagate a Bird’s Nest Fern

It is very difficult to propagate Bird’s Nest Ferns, though if you would like to try, it is best to use tissue culture method.

  • Harvest spores - The spores of your bird’s nest fern look like tiny brown lines on the undersides of the leaves. When the spores have grown large and fuzzy, trim the leaf they are growing on and carefully place the leaf in a paper bag. The spores should collect at the bottom of the bag after a few days.

  • Germinate spores - Place the spores on top of a small pot of sphagnum moss, and place the pot in a dish with water. Make sure there is always water in the dish, and mist the spores on top daily. After 2-3 weeks, they should begin to germinate.

  • Repot in fresh soil - Once you seedlings, pot in fresh soil and keep consistently moist for the first 3-4 weeks.


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Bird’s Nest Fern

A resilient fern with bright green foliage, the Bird’s Nest Fern makes an excellent accent for any home or office.