Posts tagged Bird of Paradise
Treating Scale (And Other Tough Leaf Dwelling Bugs)
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The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

We're advocates for all organic everything - even when it comes to pest control. Unfortunately, sometimes Neem Oil just doesn't cut it. Especially when it comes to Scale. Not sure what Scale is? Let us explain...

Scale insects are small, hard-shelled bugs that appear on leaves and stems and suck out vital nutrients from your plants (yeah, kinda gross). This can cause your plants to lose color, vigor, and in extreme cases, death.

So you've drenched every leaf in Neem Oil but they just won't go away? What next? Rubbing Alcohol.

  • Dab a Q-tip in rubbing alcohol and pick off the scale bugs one by one.

  • Moisten a paper towel or cotton ball and thoroughly wipe down the more infested areas

  • Continue to use Neem Oil at the base of the plant to control Scale growth in the soil.

  • Repeat this once a week for 3-5 weeks, or until you're no longer finding scale on the leaves.

Recovery will take some time, but be optimistic - indoor plants can be surprisingly resilient. Once you've controlled the issue, your plant will thank you with color and life springing back into their foliage!


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BIRD OF PARADISE

A popular indoor plant for creating that instant jungle atmosphere.

3-4ft tall plant with ceramic pot

How to Care for and Grow Your Bird of Paradise

The Bird of Paradise

AKA strelitzia nicolai

With enormous glossy leaves and lush jungle vibes, the Bird of Paradise or Strelitzia nicolai is a true head-turner when brought indoors. Named after its colorful flower which resembles a bird in flight, this stylish yet hardy plant is perfect for plant novices and experts alike. Read on for simple tips on how to care for your Bird of Paradise and enjoy years and years of growth.

Light

Water

  • Water thoroughly when topsoil is dry, usually once a week. Avoid overwatering.

  • Watering schedule may be less frequent during winter months

Growth

  • In prime conditions, the Bird of Paradise is a fast grower and can grow up to 10 feet tall indoors

  • As these are such fast growers, fertilize once every two weeks in spring and summer

Common problems with Birds of Paradise

Leaves splitting on a Bird of Paradise — it’s normal!

Leaves splitting

A lot of people worry that the splits in the leaves of birds of paradise are a sign of something wrong, but the truth is that split leaves in this plant are completely normal. As part of nature's design, the splits allow wind to pass through the leaves without bending, breaking, or uprooting the top heavy plant. While splitting may be reduced by keeping the plant indoors, it is still common and completely normal for this to occur.




Brown leaves on Bird of Paradise

Brown edges - underwatering

If you see crispy, brown edges on your Bird of Paradise, it could be that it’s underwatered or the environment is too dry. Birds of Paradise like a lot of humidity and are generally pretty thirsty plants — do not place this plant near air vents or heaters. Make sure you are watering your plant regularly, and also add misting to your routine to boost humidity levels for the plant’s foliage (you can mist every day, several times a day, or just a couple times a week!).

Yellow leaves - overwatering

If you see yellowing wilted leaves on your Bird of Paradise, it could be that your plant is overwatered. Check the roots to make sure there is no root rot. If the roots are damaged, you will need to repot your plant (see below). If the roots are fine, simply let the plant dry out before watering again.

Curling leaves

If the leaves on your Bird of Paradise are curling inward, the cause is most likely also underwatering. To let your plant replenish its moisture, give it a good shower. Remove the plant from its decorative pot and place in a shower, bathtub, or outside. Give it a thorough watering, allowing it to drain all the excess out before putting back in the pot. Depending on how dry the plant is, you may also allow it to sit in water for an hour or two.

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Bird of Paradise

Take care of your Bird of Paradise and it will take care of you! Below are simple tips to continue caring for your Bird of Paradise over time.

How to prune a Bird of Paradise
  • Pruning - This plant does not mind an occasional haircut. With clean shears, cut off older or less attractive stalks at the base. Your plant will have more energy for new growth!

  • Cleaning - Take each leaf between two soft tissue cloths and wipe off the top to reveal a healthy shine (also helps the plant soak in more light!).

  • Trimming & reshaping - Have some leaves that are perfectly healthy but have a few cosmetic damages? Simply trim the leaf to imitate its natural shape. You also may notice your bird of paradise’s leaves occasionally split. This is completely natural and not much you can do about it. Obviously, the more this plant is touched, bumped into, moved, etc, the more the leaves will split.

  • Repotting - Houseplants grow much slower than they would in the wild. Depending on the size of your plant and the density of the roots, this is nice to do every 2-3 years to provide fresh nutrients and encourage new growth.

    • When to repot - if the roots start to become visible outside the soil, it is time to consider repotting your Bird of Paradise

    • Pot sizing - if you want your plant to grow taller, find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot. If you want your plant to stay the same height, you can reuse the same pot and simply change the soil.

    • Get your hands dirty - spread out newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil and pat down firmly. Water the soil thoroughly and place the plant in an area with bright indirect light. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

 

How to propagate a Bird of Paradise

Propagating a Bird of Paradise is best done through division. That said, because Birds of Paradise like to have their roots tightly packed, it is best to only propagate from a plant that has a lot to spare or has outgrown its pot.

  • Spread a newspaper on the floor and remove the plant from its pot - You should see a giant mass of roots!

  • Determine which pieces of the plant you will divide - Carefully begin to separate or untangle the roots. If you need to cut, use clean shears.

  • Repot in fresh soil - Once you have your divided pieces, repot in fresh soil, pack down tightly, and water thoroughly. You’re done!


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Bird of Paradise

Vibrant, lush, and easy to care for, the Bird of Paradise is a popular choice houseplant with wide foliage and a tropical feel.

Bird of Paradise and Their Splits
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The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Popular for its easy going attitude and long elegant stems that produce broad, jungle-like leaves, the Bird of Paradise seems to be on everyone's radar these days! Today we're answering the top three questions we get most about this iconic plant. 

  • Split leaves - Believe it or not, the leaves of a Bird of Paradise are SUPPOSED to split! As part of nature's design, the splits allow wind to pass through the leaves without bending, breaking, or uprooting the top heavy plant. While splitting may be reduced by keeping the plant indoors and away from wind, it is still common and completely normal for this to occur.

  • Yellow edges -  native to tropical environments, this plant prefers full sun for long periods of time. Indoors they don't get us much light, which is the most common cause of yellowing leaves. The other, less common, reason for yellowing leaves is pest infestation. Check the front and back of each leaf, and treat with Neem Oil as needed.

  • Where's the flower? - Named for the colorful flower resembling a bird, it is rare for this plant to bloom indoors. The plant must reach maturity (~10 years old) and live in its native conditions— think humid, warm, and sunny. If you'd prefer a flowering version, adding one to your outdoor collection would be best!


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BIRD OF PARADISE

A popular indoor plant for creating that instant jungle atmosphere

3-4ft tall plant with ceramic pot: $299

Delivery in SF & LA included

Plant Care Tip #35: Hours of Light
Photo credit:  9to5chic ’s Bird of Paradise

Photo credit: 9to5chic’s Bird of Paradise

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Hooray for waking up to "more" daylight! Like us, plants need sunlight to survive. It gives them the energy they need to photosynthesize, which is basically how they eat and breathe. If they're not getting enough light in your home, you'll start to see them struggle. Most plants would appreciate at least 6 hours of bright sunlight. If that's just not possible in your space, here's what you can do.

  • Next to a window receiving bright light is ideal for most house plants. You can keep your plants farther from the window, but then you'll need to be extra careful about not overwatering.

  • If your plant is in a shadier spot, rotate it once a week to give its foliage equal access to light.

  • If you're risking a spot where there's really little light, you can try fulfilling its needs with an artificial grow light. You'll need to keep it on for at least 6-8 hours.

Daylight savings time is man made and plants have no idea that the time has changed 😉

The right balance of light and water in relation to the temperature and humidity of your space is all they need all year round. Just like you feel the change in seasons, your plants feel it, so make sure to take care of them as you do yourself.


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BIRD OF PARADISE

A popular indoor plant for creating that instant jungle atmosphere.

3-4ft tall in white ceramic planter: $299

Plant Care Tip #6: Pamper Your Plants
Photo by  Léon & George

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Who doesn’t love a little pampering? Spring is the best time to treat your plants to some extra TLC through dusting, pruning, and trimming! Here’s how:

  1. Dust your plant’s leaves by supporting the underside of the leaf and wiping the surface with a damp sponge or microfiber cloth. Repeat every 2-3 weeks to keep them shiny and vibrant.

  2. Prune off any unruly stems using sharp scissors or gardening shears. Cut at a 45 degree angle to help with future growth and don’t over prune! Leave at least 80-90% of your plant’s growth intact as to not shock your plant.

  3. Trim off the browning edges of your plants’ leaves but be sure to still leave a thin sliver of brown at the tip. This will avoid opening a fresh wound in your plants’ leaf (fresh wounds cause stress on plant growth). Browning at the leaf’s edge is usually a result of overwatering, so consider our watering tips if this is a reoccurring issue for you.

Spread love this spring and pamper your plants! Trust us, a little maintenance goes a long way. Our plant doctors are available 24/7 if you have any further questions about how to keep your plants happy and healthy! Email us anytime plantdoctor@leonandgeorge.com

Green & Trendy in 2018
Photo by  Essential Home  

Photo by Essential Home 

In our previous blog (Fresh Us, Fresh You), we talked about how to better yourself in 2018. To further that notion, we’re sticking to our resolution of providing trendy suggestions that can impact your interiors.

Pull from some of this year’s latest trends to set-up the right vibe for your home or office. If you recognize how to work with what you’ve got, while adding statement items where necessary, you too can accomplish the perfect interior harmony.

To help elevate the ordinary in your space, we’ve compiled our 2018 design recommendations from some of the industry’s leading all-stars:

In Vogue, Alex Papachristidis said:

“Green has been missing from the market lately. It’s a color that I love and will always use and I feel it’s making a comeback. It’s such an important color because it brings nature indoors and into the home.”

Right photo by  @hiltoncarter  left photo  Bird of Paradise  by  Léon & George       

Right photo by @hiltoncarter left photo Bird of Paradise by Léon & George      

In Homes to Love, Emma Vidgen writes:

“As our lives become more hectic and reliant on technology, our desire to reconnect with nature and return to a simpler way of life will be reflected in the design and style of our homes.”

Right photo by  Coco Lapine design  left photo  Monstera Deliciosa  by Léon & George

Right photo by Coco Lapine design left photo Monstera Deliciosa by Léon & George

In the National, Rin Hamburg suggests you:

“Use plants liberally to inject life into your home, but don’t just stick them anywhere. Create large groupings to turn them into a feature, or even max out with a living wall. Alternatively, think of unusual ways to display your plants – hang them from the ceiling or choose unexpected decorative pots. You can also mirror live plants with touches of botanical prints.”

Left photo by  California Home Design , middle photo  Snake Plant  by Léon & George, right photo  Leo's Oyster Bar  in San Francisco, CA

Left photo by California Home Design, middle photo Snake Plant by Léon & George, right photo Leo's Oyster Bar in San Francisco, CA

When revitalizing any space, houseplants are the most direct way to bring nature indoors! A safe place to start is with easy-care plants that fit in even the shadiest of corners in any home or office. Want to be bold? Our large statement plants are an immediate eye-catcher and they make a luscious focal point for any room. Does your apartment lack the floor real estate necessary to house a larger plant? Have no fear - consider some of our NEW tabletop pieces as they are easily workable in confined spaces.

Left photo  Braided Money Tree , middle photo  Zanzibar Gem , and right photo  Peace Lily  by Léon & George

Left photo Braided Money Tree, middle photo Zanzibar Gem, and right photo Peace Lily by Léon & George

Increasing your collection of greenery is a sure way to re-vamp any interior environment this year! Use the tips we’ve compiled to help liven up your home or office, after all, when you’re in a positive place, you’re more likely to pollinate others with your vibrance.

Happy decorating!