Posts tagged Snake Plant
How to Care for and Grow Your Snake Plant
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Snake Plant

AKA sansevieria laurentii

There are dozens of different varieties of Snake Plants (also known as sansevieria or Mother-in-law’s Tongue), but none quite as stunning (and air-purifying!) as the Laurentii. Robust and structural, this incredibly hardy indoor plant is the perfect choice for someone looking for a low-maintenance yet stylish addition to their home or office. Learn all about the many Snake Plant benefits and how to care for and grow this beautiful indoor plant.

Light

Snake Plants are not picky when it comes to light requirements. Bright indirect light is ideal though they also do well in low light as well as direct sun.

Water

Water once every ten days to two weeks, or whenever the top soil is completely dry. Avoid overwatering.

Growth

The Snake Plant can grow up to four or five feet tall, though they are generally pretty slow growers.

Common problems with Snake Plants

Leaves curling or falling over

Curling leaves on a Snake Plant could mean one of many things. The first thing you should do is diagnose the issue. One of the most common problems with Snake Plants are thrips, a tiny black insect that can infest and eventually kill the plant.. Check to make sure your plant is okay by shaking it on top of a white sheet of paper. If tiny black bugs fall off the plant, your plant may have thrips. Don’t panic, though! Simply remove any clearly damaged leaves with a sharp blade, then spray the plant with plenty of water and wipe it down with a clean cloth. Follow this by spray the plant with neem oil a few times a week for one month.

No sign of bugs? Check to make sure your plant isn’t over-watered or under-watered.

Dry brown tips

If you are noticing dry, brown tips on your Snake Plant, it is most likely caused by infrequent or sporadic watering. Though the Snake Plant can withstand long periods of drought, it still enjoys a regular watering routine!

Soggy spots Snake Plant leaves.

Soggy or mushy leaves

Noticing soggy or mushy leaves on your Snake Plant? This is most likely the result of overwatering or possibly even root rot. Make sure to only water your Snake Plant when the soil is dry — once every ten days to two weeks should be fine. If you suspect overwatering, you may need to remove your plant from its pot and inspect the soil below. If there is moisture, you may have a case of root rot.

Snake Plant not growing

Is your Snake Plant not growing? Don’t worry. Snake Plants can be relatively slow growers, especially in low-light conditions (a big reason why many people choose this plant). Be patient! Your plant will grow mostly in the spring and summer, and you can fertilize it during this time of year to boost growth.

 

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Snake Plant

Take care of your Snake Plant and it will take care of you — literally! The Snake Plant boasts many benefits, including releasing oxygen and purifying our air. The Sansevieria Laurentii variety is one of the best air-purifying houseplants according to Nasa, and it is excellent in filtering out toxins like formaldehyde and xylene. It also makes a wonderful bedroom plant, as it converts carbon dioxide into oxygen at night. Below are simple tips to continue caring for and enjoying the many benefits of your Snake Plant over time.

How to care for Snake Plant Sansevieria Laurentii
  • Pruning - Whether your Snake Plant is overgrown or it has some damaged leaves you’d like to remove, pruning a Snake Plant is very easy. Using a sharp, clean blade, simply cut off the stalks you’d like to remove at the base, closest as possibly to the soil. If the leaf drooping, dry, or otherwise on its way out, you may also try tugging the leaf and pulling it out from the root. It will come out easily if it’s time to go!

  • Cleaning - Take each leaf between two soft tissue cloths and wipe off the top to reveal a healthy shine (also helps the plant soak in more light!).

  • Repotting - Houseplants grow much slower than they would in the wild. Depending on the size of your plant and the density of the roots, this is nice to do every 2-3 years to provide fresh nutrients and encourage new growth.

    • When to repot - Snake Plants have extremely strong roots and will begin to literally bust out of its pot when it’s time to repot.

    • Pot sizing - if you want your plant to grow taller, find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot. If you want your plant to stay the same height, you can reuse the same pot and simply change the soil. If the latter is the case, you may need to separate some of the stalks of your Snake Plant, as they most likely will no longer all fit in the pot.

    • Get your hands dirty - spread out newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil and pat down firmly. Water the soil thoroughly and place the plant in an area with bright indirect light. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

 

How to propagate a Snake Plant

Looking to propagate your Snake Plant? They are relatively easy to propagate through a few different methods such as water propagation or division. Follow these instructions to propagate your Snake Plant:

How to care for Snake Plant Sansevieria Laurentii.
  • Cut off a leaf - To propagate simply by cutting off a leaf, simply cut the leaf at the base near the soil with a sharp clean blade, and place the leaf in water. After a week or two, you should see roots begin to sprout. Wait until the roots are at least an inch long before placing the leaf in soil. Keep the cutting just moist to the touch and in bright indirect light for a few weeks or until it has rooted (if you tug on it, it feels firmly rooted).

  • Divide roots - You can also propagate Snake Plants through division. Start by removing your plant from it’s pot and gently separating the roots and leaves into different clusters.

  • Repot the clusters - Take each cluster or leaf and place in a small pot with fresh soil.

  • Keep hydrated - Keep your new baby Snake Plants well-hydrated during the first few weeks or until they have taken root in their new pots.

Illustrations by our talented plant stylist, Kailie Barnes.


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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

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Is Repotting Your Plants an Absolute Must?
Illustration by @kail_bales

Illustration by @kail_bales

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Did you know that repotting your plants isn’t 100% necessary in most cases? That’s right— it’s optional! After researching and testing what works for best for busy city dwellers, here’s our rundown on considerations for optimal indoor plant health.

  • Room for growth - the main reason to consider repotting is to give your plants room for growth. If you start to see roots growing out the drainage holes or circling around the top, potting up to a larger size will allow your plant to grow taller. If you want your plant to stay the same height and shape, you can keep it in its current pot size.

  • Drainage - all plants need drainage so that their roots don’t stay sitting in soggy soil. The plants we buy for our homes are grown in plastic nursery pots that are already pierced for appropriate draining. Many decorative planters that are designed for indoor use don’t have drainage holes, so it’s not advised to repot directly into these.

  • Staging - the method we’ve found that works best for keeping your plants healthy and your home stylish is this one. You can keep your designer ceramics cleaner and your plant comfortable in its nursery pot by simply matching the two to your desired height and finishing the top with a light cover of moss or pebbles. This reduces the amount of shock your plant experiences as it settles into your home and is easier for health checks and proper watering. 

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SNAKE PLANT

A large succulent and thus extremely adaptable and low maintenance – the perfect starter plant. It is also a terrific air purifier, making it a healthy and attractive addition to any indoor space.

Our Favorite Varieties of Snake Plants
The many varieties of snake plants (and all their benefits!).

Looking for the perfect variety of Snake Plant for your home or office?

The Snake Plant, also known as Mother-in-Law’s Tongue or Sansevieria, is a popular indoor plant not only for its elegant, structural beauty, but also for its extreme hardiness, adaptability, and air-purifying power. Learn about the many different varieties of Snake Plants, and which one speaks to you most!

Our favorite Snake Plant varieties.

Sanseviera Laurentii

Not all Snake Plants are created equal, and Sansevieria Laurentii is the proof. In a study performed by Nasa, this Snake Plant variety came out as not only one of the best air-purifying plants among Snake Plants in general, but among houseplants in general as well. Green leaves with bright yellow edges are what make this Snake Plant stand out from the rest.

 
The Sansevieria Trifasciata. Photo by  @plant_wizard .

The Sansevieria Trifasciata. Photo by @plant_wizard.

Sanseveria Trifasciata

Similar to the Laurentii but without the yellow leaves, the Sanseveria Trifasciata is another gorgeous, structural Snake Plant that can survive with little to no light and occasional neglect.

 
The Moonshine Snake Plant. Photo by  @planty_days .

The Moonshine Snake Plant. Photo by @planty_days.

Moonshine Snake Plant

One of our favorite varieties of Snake Plants, the Moonshine Snake Plant boasts unique, sage green leaves. Generally on the shorter side (2-3 feet tall), this plant can be a bit stouter and more robust than its cousins of similar shape and size.

 
The Sansevieria Cylindrica. Photo by  @plantosaurs .

The Sansevieria Cylindrica. Photo by @plantosaurs.

Sanseviera Cylindrica

Like its name implies, the Sanseviera Cylindrica (sometimes also referred to as African Spear) grows tough cylindrical spears from its base. Sometimes braided, and sometimes in form of a star (Sanseviera Cylindrica Starfish), this variety of Snake Plant is, like others, requires very little maintenance to thrive. Though it can survive in low light conditions, bright indirect light is best for this Snake Plant, which will grow its spears towards the light source if not getting enough.


 

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Snake Plants and Their Soggy Spots
Snake Plant and soggy spots

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

A member of the succulent family, making it super adaptable to almost any environment and incredibly low maintenance. Despite its easy-going attitude, there are still a few easy traps to fall prey to.

  • Soggy fronds and brown tips are a result of overwatering or an inconsistent watering schedule. With shallow root systems, they're susceptible to root rot which will cause fronds to tip over and show soggy spots.

    • To treat, first identify if root rot has occurred. If yes, trim infected roots and change the soil. If no, start decreasing the amount of water you give the plant and get on a regular schedule.

    • Brown tips can be trimmed, but leave a thin sliver of dried edge to avoid further damage to the plant.

  • Scars are common but can be easily avoided. Even though Snake Plants are hearty and can survive a wide range of conditions, they don't have the toughest skin. Any bumps or scratches will cause the skin to break and eventually scar.

    • While you can't remove the scars, eventually, they'll appear smaller as the plant grows and therefore less noticeable. Keep your plant in a low traffic area to avoid the risk of more damage.

  • Fronds that fold in on themselves is less common, but a crucial problem to remedy as quickly as possible. An infestation of a pest called Thrips is likely the cause. They're nearly impossible to see, but can be harmful to the plant if left untreated. 

    • Remove any fronds that are curled in or are suspect to infection. Wipe down remaining leaves with Neem Oil, check every few weeks and re-apply to avoid re-infestation.

large-snake.jpg

SNAKE PLANT

A large succulent and thus extremely adaptable and low maintenance – the perfect starter plant. It is also a terrific air purifier, making it a healthy and attractive addition to any indoor space.

Plant Care Tip #20: Propagating & Dividing
Snake Plant division, photo credit: L&G plant parent David D.

Snake Plant division, photo credit: L&G plant parent David D.

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

When you see new babies growing, experiment with dividing and growing yourself new houseplants! Different types of plants have different propagation methods, this weekend we’ll focus on a method called Division, applicable to Snake Plants, Zanzibar Gems, Magenta Triostars, Parlor Palms, Elephant’s Ears, Birds of Paradise and Peace Lilies.

  • Step 1: Find a pot that is proportionate to the size of your new plant, smaller than larger is best, and get some new soil.

  • Step 2: Remove the mother plant from the nursery pot and clear the soil from the roots.

  • Step 3: Identify where you would like to divide the plant and gently pull apart the roots or use a sharp knife.

  • Step 4: Plant your cutting deep enough into the new pot so that the roots can be covered and the top will be stable.

  • Step 5: Lightly water your new plant and place it in bright, but not direct light.

Voila! Now you have a new plant! Don’t forget to nicely plant the mother back in her home and enjoy as mother nature takes its course.

Our plant doctors are available 24/7 for any questions about keeping your plants happy and healthy! Email us anytime plantdoctor@leonandgeorge.com


Indoor Plant Inspiration

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SNAKE PLANT

A large succulent and thus extremely adaptable and low maintenance, the perfect gift for the garden-challenged. It is also a terrific air purifier, making it a healthy and attractive addition to any indoor space.

1 ½ft tall plant + ceramic pot + stand
Delivery in SF included

Plant Care Tip #19: Play music
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The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

It's true! Playing your plants some tunes can boost their mood and growth. While they don't always have a preference if you're playing classical or heavy metal, research has shown that plants appreciate the vibes. You can:

  • Play music when you're around the house

  • Set a radio alarm for a few hours a day

  • Sing to them!

Try it out for the rest of the summer and observe your plants as they bloom!

Our plant doctors are available 24/7 for any questions about keeping your plants happy and healthy! Email us anytime plantdoctor@leonandgeorge.com
 


Indoor Plant Inspiration

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LARGE SNAKE PLANT

A large succulent and thus extremely adaptable and low maintenance – the perfect starter plant. It is also a terrific air purifier, making it a healthy and attractive addition to any indoor space.

3ft tall plant with ceramic pot and reclaimed wood stand: $299
Delivery in SF & LA included

Green & Trendy in 2018
Photo by  Essential Home  

Photo by Essential Home 

In our previous blog (Fresh Us, Fresh You), we talked about how to better yourself in 2018. To further that notion, we’re sticking to our resolution of providing trendy suggestions that can impact your interiors.

Pull from some of this year’s latest trends to set-up the right vibe for your home or office. If you recognize how to work with what you’ve got, while adding statement items where necessary, you too can accomplish the perfect interior harmony.

To help elevate the ordinary in your space, we’ve compiled our 2018 design recommendations from some of the industry’s leading all-stars:

In Vogue, Alex Papachristidis said:

“Green has been missing from the market lately. It’s a color that I love and will always use and I feel it’s making a comeback. It’s such an important color because it brings nature indoors and into the home.”

Right photo by  @hiltoncarter  left photo  Bird of Paradise  by  Léon & George       

Right photo by @hiltoncarter left photo Bird of Paradise by Léon & George      

In Homes to Love, Emma Vidgen writes:

“As our lives become more hectic and reliant on technology, our desire to reconnect with nature and return to a simpler way of life will be reflected in the design and style of our homes.”

Right photo by  Coco Lapine design  left photo  Monstera Deliciosa  by Léon & George

Right photo by Coco Lapine design left photo Monstera Deliciosa by Léon & George

In the National, Rin Hamburg suggests you:

“Use plants liberally to inject life into your home, but don’t just stick them anywhere. Create large groupings to turn them into a feature, or even max out with a living wall. Alternatively, think of unusual ways to display your plants – hang them from the ceiling or choose unexpected decorative pots. You can also mirror live plants with touches of botanical prints.”

Left photo by  California Home Design , middle photo  Snake Plant  by Léon & George, right photo  Leo's Oyster Bar  in San Francisco, CA

Left photo by California Home Design, middle photo Snake Plant by Léon & George, right photo Leo's Oyster Bar in San Francisco, CA

When revitalizing any space, houseplants are the most direct way to bring nature indoors! A safe place to start is with easy-care plants that fit in even the shadiest of corners in any home or office. Want to be bold? Our large statement plants are an immediate eye-catcher and they make a luscious focal point for any room. Does your apartment lack the floor real estate necessary to house a larger plant? Have no fear - consider some of our NEW tabletop pieces as they are easily workable in confined spaces.

Left photo  Braided Money Tree , middle photo  Zanzibar Gem , and right photo  Peace Lily  by Léon & George

Left photo Braided Money Tree, middle photo Zanzibar Gem, and right photo Peace Lily by Léon & George

Increasing your collection of greenery is a sure way to re-vamp any interior environment this year! Use the tips we’ve compiled to help liven up your home or office, after all, when you’re in a positive place, you’re more likely to pollinate others with your vibrance.

Happy decorating!