Posts tagged Plant Care
How to Repot Your Plant
How to repot your plant: a step-by-step guide!

Thinking of repotting your plant?

Repotting houseplants may seem like a scary endeavor if you’ve never gotten your hands dirty, but anyone who has ever repotted will agree that it’s not only simple but also quite fun and enjoyable as well! Learn when to repot, and how, with this simple guide.

Do you have to repot your plant?

Our Plant Doctors receive many enquiries about when to repot plants, or if it’s an absolute must for the plant to thrive. The truth is that most indoor plants only need repotting once every one or two years (though some slow growers can survive many years in the same pot!), and even then, it isn’t necessarily required to repot them in a bigger container.

The primary reason why we repot plants is to give them fresh, nutrient-rich soil, which can easily be done by removing the plant from its pot and shaking the old dirt off the roots. At that point, if you’d like your plant to stay the same size, you may simply repot it directly in the old pot, of course with fresh new soil. If you’d like your plant to grow bigger, you can repot it in something about two inches larger than what it was in before.

Of course depending on the plant, it could potentially survive years without repotting. But if you want your plant to thrive, think about giving it some fresh soil every few years!

When to repot your plant

As mentioned above, it’s good practice with indoor plants to repot once every one or two years. However, sometimes your plant may also send you signals that it’s time to repot. Here are some signs you may look for:

  • Matted roots on the soil surface, as can be common with Fiddle Leaf Figs

  • The roots are coming out at the bottom, through the drainage holes for example, not uncommon with Birds of Paradise

  • The roots are seemingly “busting” at the seams, as sometimes seen on the Snake Plant or Zanzibar Gem (and if the plant is in a plastic nursery pot, it may well break it!)

  • The roots are quite literally “pushing” the plant out of the pot

  • The plant dries out very quickly, for example in a matter of days

The best time of year to repot your plant is in the spring or summer, as this is when plants are actively growing. That said, is not the end of the world if for whatever reason you need to repot in the middle of winter!

How to repot your plant

Before repotting your plant, make sure you have the necessary materials to repot:

  • Fresh, indoor potting soil

  • If desired, a new bigger pot

  • Sharp, clean shears

When your plant is dry, or before it's next watering, follow these simple instructions:

  1. Remove the plant from its pot. For smaller plants, you can do this by simply turning over the pot and letting the plant slide out. For larger plants, you may need to lift it out while holding the pot to the floor (pro tip: spread newspaper over the floor for easy clean up!). If your plant is difficult to remove from the pot (the roots are twisting out the drainage holes), you may need to simply cut these roots off to get it out.

  2. Shake the soil off the roots, removing about half of the old soil. You may need to gently detangle some of the roots to do this. Don’t panic if some of them rip or break. You may also prune some roots, especially if you are planning on potting it in the same pot as before.

  3. Pour a couple inches of fresh potting soil into the pot and pat down so it’s firm.

  4. Place the plant in the pot and fill with more soil until it’s secure in place and standing straight. Pat down again until firm.

  5. Fill with soil to the top of the pot, but make sure to leave about an inch so that water does not overflow when you water your plant.

  6. Water thoroughly and let the plant completely drain.

Voilà! You’re done. Remember that your plant may be a little unstable the first few weeks in its new pot, so take care when moving it back to its home.


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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

Premium plants paired with stylish ceramics. Order online at leonandgeorge.com

Treating Scale (And Other Tough Leaf Dwelling Bugs)
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The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

We're advocates for all organic everything - even when it comes to pest control. Unfortunately, sometimes Neem Oil just doesn't cut it. Especially when it comes to Scale. Not sure what Scale is? Let us explain...

Scale insects are small, hard-shelled bugs that appear on leaves and stems and suck out vital nutrients from your plants (yeah, kinda gross). This can cause your plants to lose color, vigor, and in extreme cases, death.

So you've drenched every leaf in Neem Oil but they just won't go away? What next? Rubbing Alcohol.

  • Dab a Q-tip in rubbing alcohol and pick off the scale bugs one by one.

  • Moisten a paper towel or cotton ball and thoroughly wipe down the more infested areas

  • Continue to use Neem Oil at the base of the plant to control Scale growth in the soil.

  • Repeat this once a week for 3-5 weeks, or until you're no longer finding scale on the leaves.

Recovery will take some time, but be optimistic - indoor plants can be surprisingly resilient. Once you've controlled the issue, your plant will thank you with color and life springing back into their foliage!


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BIRD OF PARADISE

A popular indoor plant for creating that instant jungle atmosphere.

3-4ft tall plant with ceramic pot

How to Care for and Grow Your Snake Plant
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Snake Plant

AKA sansevieria laurentii

There are dozens of different varieties of Snake Plants (also known as sansevieria or Mother-in-law’s Tongue), but none quite as stunning (and air-purifying!) as the Laurentii. Robust and structural, this incredibly hardy indoor plant is the perfect choice for someone looking for a low-maintenance yet stylish addition to their home or office. Learn all about the many Snake Plant benefits and how to care for and grow this beautiful indoor plant.

Light

Snake Plants are not picky when it comes to light requirements. Bright indirect light is ideal though they also do well in low light as well as direct sun.

Water

Water once every ten days to two weeks, or whenever the top soil is completely dry. Avoid overwatering.

Growth

The Snake Plant can grow up to four or five feet tall, though they are generally pretty slow growers.

Common problems with Snake Plants

Leaves curling or falling over

Curling leaves on a Snake Plant could mean one of many things. The first thing you should do is diagnose the issue. One of the most common problems with Snake Plants are thrips, a tiny black insect that can infest and eventually kill the plant.. Check to make sure your plant is okay by shaking it on top of a white sheet of paper. If tiny black bugs fall off the plant, your plant may have thrips. Don’t panic, though! Simply remove any clearly damaged leaves with a sharp blade, then spray the plant with plenty of water and wipe it down with a clean cloth. Follow this by spray the plant with neem oil a few times a week for one month.

No sign of bugs? Check to make sure your plant isn’t over-watered or under-watered.

Dry brown tips

If you are noticing dry, brown tips on your Snake Plant, it is most likely caused by infrequent or sporadic watering. Though the Snake Plant can withstand long periods of drought, it still enjoys a regular watering routine!

Soggy spots Snake Plant leaves.

Soggy or mushy leaves

Noticing soggy or mushy leaves on your Snake Plant? This is most likely the result of overwatering or possibly even root rot. Make sure to only water your Snake Plant when the soil is dry — once every ten days to two weeks should be fine. If you suspect overwatering, you may need to remove your plant from its pot and inspect the soil below. If there is moisture, you may have a case of root rot.

Snake Plant not growing

Is your Snake Plant not growing? Don’t worry. Snake Plants can be relatively slow growers, especially in low-light conditions (a big reason why many people choose this plant). Be patient! Your plant will grow mostly in the spring and summer, and you can fertilize it during this time of year to boost growth.

 

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Snake Plant

Take care of your Snake Plant and it will take care of you — literally! The Snake Plant boasts many benefits, including releasing oxygen and purifying our air. The Sansevieria Laurentii variety is one of the best air-purifying houseplants according to Nasa, and it is excellent in filtering out toxins like formaldehyde and xylene. It also makes a wonderful bedroom plant, as it converts carbon dioxide into oxygen at night. Below are simple tips to continue caring for and enjoying the many benefits of your Snake Plant over time.

How to care for Snake Plant Sansevieria Laurentii
  • Pruning - Whether your Snake Plant is overgrown or it has some damaged leaves you’d like to remove, pruning a Snake Plant is very easy. Using a sharp, clean blade, simply cut off the stalks you’d like to remove at the base, closest as possibly to the soil. If the leaf drooping, dry, or otherwise on its way out, you may also try tugging the leaf and pulling it out from the root. It will come out easily if it’s time to go!

  • Cleaning - Take each leaf between two soft tissue cloths and wipe off the top to reveal a healthy shine (also helps the plant soak in more light!).

  • Repotting - Houseplants grow much slower than they would in the wild. Depending on the size of your plant and the density of the roots, this is nice to do every 2-3 years to provide fresh nutrients and encourage new growth.

    • When to repot - Snake Plants have extremely strong roots and will begin to literally bust out of its pot when it’s time to repot.

    • Pot sizing - if you want your plant to grow taller, find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot. If you want your plant to stay the same height, you can reuse the same pot and simply change the soil. If the latter is the case, you may need to separate some of the stalks of your Snake Plant, as they most likely will no longer all fit in the pot.

    • Get your hands dirty - spread out newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil and pat down firmly. Water the soil thoroughly and place the plant in an area with bright indirect light. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

 

How to propagate a Snake Plant

Looking to propagate your Snake Plant? They are relatively easy to propagate through a few different methods such as water propagation or division. Follow these instructions to propagate your Snake Plant:

How to care for Snake Plant Sansevieria Laurentii.
  • Cut off a leaf - To propagate simply by cutting off a leaf, simply cut the leaf at the base near the soil with a sharp clean blade, and place the leaf in water. After a week or two, you should see roots begin to sprout. Wait until the roots are at least an inch long before placing the leaf in soil. Keep the cutting just moist to the touch and in bright indirect light for a few weeks or until it has rooted (if you tug on it, it feels firmly rooted).

  • Divide roots - You can also propagate Snake Plants through division. Start by removing your plant from it’s pot and gently separating the roots and leaves into different clusters.

  • Repot the clusters - Take each cluster or leaf and place in a small pot with fresh soil.

  • Keep hydrated - Keep your new baby Snake Plants well-hydrated during the first few weeks or until they have taken root in their new pots.

Illustrations by our talented plant stylist, Kailie Barnes.


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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

Premium plants paired with stylish ceramics. Shop online at leonandgeorge.com.

Late Summer Rotation Reminder
Photo credit:  @minima_organizing

Photo credit: @minima_organizing

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

We hate to even acknowledge it, but summer is winding down (😢). Make the most of these brighter, longer days and give your plants a 180-degree turn. This provides the foliage an even chance to soak up the last of the warm summer sun. You'll have this technique to thank when you see full and even growth come autumn.

*Pro tip*: Give your plants a vitamin boost (aka fertilize) before temperatures cool and growth starts to slow down.


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RUBBER TREE

A unique indoor plant option with dark leaves and crimson colored casings. Easy care and air-purifying.

Trimming Brown Edges Promotes New Growth

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

If you're a first time plant owner, you might be alarmed when seeing browning edges and drying leaves. This is your plant's natural way to express itself! While you make adjustments for its comfort, don't be afraid to give it a makeover. Trimming is completely safe and allows your plant to redirect more energy to new growth. Here are a few simple tips as you prepare those scissors:

  • Check that the blades are clean or disinfect them with rubbing alcohol

  • Trim off whole leaves as close to the root as possible

  • Follow the leaf's natural lines when reshaping edges


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CALATHEA RATTLESNAKE

Named for the unique pattern on its foliage, this prayer plant is also admired for its various colors.

How to Care for and Grow Your Dragon Tree

Dragon Tree

AKA dracaena marginata

A timeless indoor plant with a striking appearance, the Dragon Tree (dracaena marginata) is known for its slender striped leaves that burst out of strong trunks. One of the easiest plants to care for and a fabulous indoor air-purifier, the Dragon Tree requires little maintenance to bring beauty and elegance to any space it graces. Learn how to care for and grow your very own Dragon Tree.

Light

Dragon Trees prefer bright indirect light, though they can adjust to medium to low levels of light. Keep them out of harsh direct sunlight, as too much of it can scorch their leaves.

Water

Let your Dragon Tree dry out between waterings. Water thoroughly when topsoil is dry, usually once a week. Avoid overwatering, and note that your watering schedule may be less frequent during winter months.

Growth

The Dragon Tree is a slow grower, though it is constantly unfolding new leaves and shedding old ones. Indoors, the Dragon Tree can reach up to eight feet tall.

Common problems with Dragon Trees

Leaves falling off

If you see your Dragon Tree leaves falling off, worry not! The Dragon Tree naturally sheds its leaves, so it is not uncommon for you to find them at the base of the soil or on the floor. To avoid them falling to the ground, you may periodically prune your Dragon Tree by simply removing any dead leaves once a week or so. Also consider fertilizing your plant in the spring and summer to make sure there are enough nutrients to go around the many many leaves!

If your Dragon Tree is losing many leaves (think the floor is covered in leaves and/or the plant in general is showing other signs of distress), you may actually have a problem. Check first to make sure you are not overwatering — the soil should dry out in between waterings. Overwatering can lead to more severe ailments and that may eventually require you change the soil.  

Leaves drooping

If you see leaves dropping on your Dragon Tree, it’s very possible you are either overwatering or underwatering. If you suspect it’s underwatering, give your Dragon Tree a thorough shower and let it completely drain out — it should perk up in within 24 hours. If you suspect overwatering, check the soil, particularly at the bottom of the plant. Is there moisture? Let the plant dry out before watering again, and if you expect a case of root rot, you may need to repot the plant with fresh soil.

Leaves turning brown

Are the new leaves of your Dragon Tree turning brown? This could be due to temperature fluctuations. The Dragon Tree does not like drastic temperature changes that could be caused by air vents (AC or heating) or drafts. Make sure your plant is protected from

 

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Dragon Tree

How to care for Dragon tree dracena marginata

Take care of your Dragon Tree and it will take care of you! Below are simple tips to continue caring for your Monstera over time.

  • Pruning - Remove dry or dead leaves all year round, but save any major pruning for the spring and summer months. If you would like to remove an entire stalk or branch of your Dragon Tree, simply cut them off at a 45 degree angle with sharp pruning shears.

  • Cleaning - With so many thin leaves, the Dragon Tree can be difficult to clean! We recommend regularly misting to keep dust off, and occasionally cleaning the leaves with a moist towel.

  • Repotting - Houseplants grow much slower than they would in the wild. Depending on the size of your plant and the density of the roots, this is nice to do every 2-3 years to provide fresh nutrients and encourage new growth.

    • When to repot - If the roots of your Dragon Tree are outgrowing its pot, it will let you know by bulging out at the sides.

    • Pot sizing - if you want your plant to grow taller, find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot. If you want your plant to stay the same height, you can reuse the same pot and simply change the soil. You may need to cut back some of the roots to do this.

    • Get your hands dirty - spread out newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil and pat down firmly. Water the soil thoroughly and place the plant in an area with bright indirect light. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

 

How to propagate a Dragon Tree

The Dragon Tree is a simple plant to propagate. Though there are many ways to do this, water propagation is generally the easiest way to go about it. Follow these instructions to propagate your Dragon Tree:

  • Select a branch or stalk to propagate - Using sharp, clean scissors or shears, cut a branch off your Dragon tree at a 45 degree angle.

  • Place in water - Find a clear glass and fill with water. Make sure only the stem is submerged, and no leaves are sitting in the water.

  • Place in a bright area and wait! - Avoid any direct sun. You may need to change the water out every few days to keep it fresh. It usually takes just a few days for the root to start growing.

  • Transfer to soil - After a few weeks, transfer to indoor potting soil. Depending on the size of the branch and its roots, make sure to choose an appropriate size pot — you do not want an overly large pot for a small cutting or roots.

  • Keep hydrated - During the first few weeks, or until your plant feels firmly rooted in its soil, regularly water and drain your Dragon Tree. The soil should be just barely moist to the touch at all times.


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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

Premium plants paired with stylish ceramics. Order online at leonandgeorge.com

Is Repotting Your Plants an Absolute Must?
Illustration by @kail_bales

Illustration by @kail_bales

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Did you know that repotting your plants isn’t 100% necessary in most cases? That’s right— it’s optional! After researching and testing what works for best for busy city dwellers, here’s our rundown on considerations for optimal indoor plant health.

  • Room for growth - the main reason to consider repotting is to give your plants room for growth. If you start to see roots growing out the drainage holes or circling around the top, potting up to a larger size will allow your plant to grow taller. If you want your plant to stay the same height and shape, you can keep it in its current pot size.

  • Drainage - all plants need drainage so that their roots don’t stay sitting in soggy soil. The plants we buy for our homes are grown in plastic nursery pots that are already pierced for appropriate draining. Many decorative planters that are designed for indoor use don’t have drainage holes, so it’s not advised to repot directly into these.

  • Staging - the method we’ve found that works best for keeping your plants healthy and your home stylish is this one. You can keep your designer ceramics cleaner and your plant comfortable in its nursery pot by simply matching the two to your desired height and finishing the top with a light cover of moss or pebbles. This reduces the amount of shock your plant experiences as it settles into your home and is easier for health checks and proper watering. 

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SNAKE PLANT

A large succulent and thus extremely adaptable and low maintenance – the perfect starter plant. It is also a terrific air purifier, making it a healthy and attractive addition to any indoor space.

Watering Tips and Tricks
Photo credit:  leonandgeorge.com

Photo credit: leonandgeorge.com

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Watering your plants truly is a simple task, but here are a few quick tips to make elevate your routine to leave your plants happier, healthier, and better looking than ever.

  • Water around the edges of the pot since that's where the roots gather. This makes it easier for your plant to drink and get even saturation.

  • Room temperature water (about 68ºF) is optimum for nutrient absorption and doesn't give your plant the shock of being too hot or too cold.

  • Watering your plants in the morning allows them to stay hydrated during the day, a nice feeling during the summer!


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JUNIOR FIDDLE LEAF FIG TREE

A lush and sculptural plant with elegant violin-shaped leaves, the Junior Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree makes for a dramatic addition to any indoor space – truly a must-have for all who appreciate style and greenery.

3-4ft tall plant with ceramic pot and reclaimed wood stand: $299

How to Propagate Pilea Peperomiodes AKA The Chinese Money Plant
How to propagate the Pilea or Chinese Money Plant with cuttings.

How to propagate the Pilea or Chinese Money Plant with cuttings.

Wondering how to propagate the Pilea to pass on to friends?

Propagation with cuttings is a simple way to multiply your plant, and the Pilea, also known as the Chinese Money Plant or the Friendship Plant, is the perfect candidate! In fact, it gets the nickname “Friendship Plant” because it was traditionally passed on from one friend to another via cuttings. As such, for a long time it was a hard plant to find on the shelves of local plant shops and nurseries. Luckily, that’s no longer the case, which makes it the perfect gift to send to a friend, or get for yourself and pass along cuttings!

How to propagate the Pilea

Step one: Locate small offsets, or baby Pileas, at the base of the plant. You will find these below the main stalk— if you’re plant doesn’t have any, hold off! They will sprout up soon.

Step two: Using a clean blade, cut an offset at the base or closest to the soil as possible.

Step three: Place the stem of the offset in a small glass or jar with water. Make sure only the stem or shoot is submerged — do not submerge any leaves as they will rot (you may need to remove some leaves).

Step four: Place in an area with bright, indirect light and wait. You may like to change the water every few days to keep it fresh. After a week or two, you should see roots begin to sprout.

Step five: Once the roots have grown to about an inch long, carefully place them in a small pot with fresh soil, gently pressing down on the soil once it’s potted. Keep the soil just moist to the touch for the first few weeks until the plant has taken root.

Good luck, happy propagating, and show us your new plant babies by tagging us @leonandgeorge on Instagram!

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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

Order online at leonandgeorge.com

Cleaning dusty plant leaves
Photo credit:  wikihow

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Dusty leaves be gone! Dirty or sticky leaves not only look unpleasant, they also prevent your plant from photosynthesizing properly. Here are ways to kick the cleanliness up a notch, and get your plants looking and feeling their best!

  • Mix your cleaning solution - use a ratio of 3 tablespoons of mild dish soap mixed with a gallon of room temperature water

  • Cleaning small plants - dip and swish their leaves around in the solution to remove dirt, grime or bugs and rinse with clean water immediately after

  • Cleaning large plants - use a cloth and wipe each leaf clean with the soapy water, rinse off with a clean non-soapy damp cloth (if you're seeing bugs, leave the soapy solution on for a few minutes to an hour)

*Bonus tip* - dish soaps can double as a mild insecticide. If you're seeing any critters, leave the soapy mix on for a few minutes to an hour before rinsing.


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PARLOR PALM

A compact palm with bright green foliage and jungle vibes.

1 ½ft tall with ceramic pot and walnut wood stand.

Spider Webs and Mites on Houseplants
Photo credit:  reddit

Photo credit: reddit

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Checked your plant's fronds lately? Asides from watering, dusting and checking for insects from time to time should be part of maintaining your plant's health. Check the undersides of leaves and all the stems. If you spot any thin silky webs, it's likely that a few spider mites have decided to take up residency. Treat the problem ASAP to prevent it from spreading.  

  • Clean off your plant with a sturdy stream of cold water in your sink, shower, or outdoors with a hose. Thoroughly spray the tops and bottoms of leaves and stems to completely wash away all webs, mites, and eggs.

  • Let your plant dry off, then treat the infested areas with a natural pesticide like Neem Oil

  • Repeat this process once a week for three weeks to make sure the mites don't come back

Spider mites appear when conditions are hot and dry. If this is a regular issue for you, try adding humidity and air circulation to your plant's environment. These pesky critters essentially feed on your plants, draw out their nutrients needed to survive, and cause leaves to drop until the plant eventually dies. Luckily, they're easy to control if caught early!


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JUNIOR FIDDLE LEAF FIG BUSH

A lush and sculptural plant with elegant violin-shaped leaves, the Junior Fiddle Leaf Fig Bush makes for a dramatic addition to any indoor space – truly a must-have for all who appreciate style and greenery.

3-4ft tall plant with ceramic pot and reclaimed wood stand: $299

How to Prevent and Fix Root Rot
How to fix root rot indoor plants

Have you ever dealt with an ugly case of root rot?

Root rot is a common issue with potted plants, and one that’s fairly easy to avoid by simply following a few basic rules of watering and drainage. And if it’s too late? Fret not! There may still be time to save your plant. Below are tips on how to prevent root rot in the first place, and how to fix root rot once it’s too late.

What is root rot?

Root rot is exactly what it sounds like — the rotting of a plant’s roots — and is the consequence of too much watering and/or not enough drainage. Though it can occur in outdoor plants, it is much more common with indoor greenery and can lead to the quick demise of your plant.

How can I prevent root rot?

Preventing root rot is simple. It’s all about watering and drainage. Follow these simple rules and you will never see root rot in your plants.

  • Give your plant proper drainage - Make sure your plant is potted in something with drainage hole(s), either a plastic nursery pot or a decorative pot that has a drainage hole. If your decorative pot does not have a drainage hole, simply leave the plant in its plastic pot and place it inside the decorative pot.

  • Keep a regular watering schedule - Most plants appreciate regular watering schedules. Sporadic watering is a quick way to hurt your plant as it often means the plant does not have time to dry out at all between waterings (thus leading to root rot)

  • Check the soil - If you don’t do this already, always check the soil of your plant before watering. Most plants like to dry out a bit, so depending on the plant you have, you may want to hold off on watering until the top two inches of the soil is dry.

  • Aerate the soil - Aerating the soil helps loosen it up, allowing for a more even distribution of water and better flow of oxygen, preventing moisture build up in the roots of your plant.

A sure sign of root rot, particularly in the popular Fiddle Leaf Fig plant, is browning on the edges of the leaves. Read more on how to fix root rot on Fiddle Leaf Figs  here .

A sure sign of root rot, particularly in the popular Fiddle Leaf Fig plant, is browning on the edges of the leaves. Read more on how to fix root rot on Fiddle Leaf Figs here.

Help! How do I fix root rot?

If your plant has root rot and you catch it early on, you may be able to save it by acting fast. Follow these steps to fix root rot in most common houseplants.

  • Diagnose the issue - If your plant has been dropping leaves, yellowing, or getting soft, mushy leaves, you may have root rot. Remove the plant from its pot and inspect the roots. If they are soft, wet, brown, and/or mushy, it’s time to roll up your sleeves and treat the roots.

  • Clean the roots - Once your plant is out of its pot, carefully remove as much soil as possible and cut the affected roots off with clean shears or scissors. Under running water, gently wash the remaining roots clean of any soil.

  • Repot - In a pot with proper drainage, repot your plant using fresh soil (and if you’re using the same pot, make sure to clean it thoroughly first!). If it was a serious case and you removed many roots, you may also prune the top of the plant a bit so the plant has less leaves to send its energy to.

  • Place in a bright spot - Water only when the top of the soil is dry. After a few weeks, your plant should take root and return to the healthy specimen it once was!

Good luck, don’t panic, and remember — the more in touch you are with your plants, the more likely they are to thrive. Water them regularly, watch for issues, and enjoy the many benefits they bring to your physical and mental health!

Are you a Léon & George customer and need additional help? Remember that you have access to our virtual plant doctor for any plant care needs!

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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

Order online at leonandgeorge.com