Posts in Plant Care
Insect Control
Before and after of Pothos being watered

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

It's fall, everything is cold, and our plants aren't drying out as quickly in between waterings. Increased moisture in our plant's soil is dangerous for a handful of reasons, but maybe none more annoying and frustrating than insects. Specifically, flying insects like gnats and mosquitos. While typically harmless, these pesky flyers can do serious damage to the roots of plants if the infestation goes uncontrolled. Follow these quick and easy steps to prevent and treat any infestations this fall, winter, and beyond!

  • Most pests lay their eggs in damp soil. Allowing the soil to dry between waterings is key to prevention.

  • If pests arrive, start watering from the bottom up to prevent top layers of soil from being too wet.

  • Use Neem Oil, a soap and water mixture, or any other organic insect repellent at first sight of bugs. Thoroughly cover leaves, stems, and the first two inches of soil in order to drench all bugs and prevent larvae in the soil from hatching. This method typically takes multiple applications in order to be successful.

  • As a last resort, systemic insect control granules are effective for protecting and ridding your plants of pests over time. #plantcare #plantlove #leonandgeorge


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CASCADING POTHOS

An easy-care planta with smooth and leathery heart-shaped leaves.

1 ½ft tall with ceramic & wood stand: $139

How to Repot Your Plant
How to repot your plant: a step-by-step guide!

Thinking of repotting your plant?

Repotting houseplants may seem like a scary endeavor if you’ve never gotten your hands dirty, but anyone who has ever repotted will agree that it’s not only simple but also quite fun and enjoyable as well! Learn when to repot, and how, with this simple guide.

Do you have to repot your plant?

Our Plant Doctors receive many enquiries about when to repot plants, or if it’s an absolute must for the plant to thrive. The truth is that most indoor plants only need repotting once every one or two years (though some slow growers can survive many years in the same pot!), and even then, it isn’t necessarily required to repot them in a bigger container.

The primary reason why we repot plants is to give them fresh, nutrient-rich soil, which can easily be done by removing the plant from its pot and shaking the old dirt off the roots. At that point, if you’d like your plant to stay the same size, you may simply repot it directly in the old pot, of course with fresh new soil. If you’d like your plant to grow bigger, you can repot it in something about two inches larger than what it was in before.

Of course depending on the plant, it could potentially survive years without repotting. But if you want your plant to thrive, think about giving it some fresh soil every few years!

When to repot your plant

As mentioned above, it’s good practice with indoor plants to repot once every one or two years. However, sometimes your plant may also send you signals that it’s time to repot. Here are some signs you may look for:

  • Matted roots on the soil surface, as can be common with Fiddle Leaf Figs

  • The roots are coming out at the bottom, through the drainage holes for example, not uncommon with Birds of Paradise

  • The roots are seemingly “busting” at the seams, as sometimes seen on the Snake Plant or Zanzibar Gem (and if the plant is in a plastic nursery pot, it may well break it!)

  • The roots are quite literally “pushing” the plant out of the pot

  • The plant dries out very quickly, for example in a matter of days

The best time of year to repot your plant is in the spring or summer, as this is when plants are actively growing. That said, is not the end of the world if for whatever reason you need to repot in the middle of winter!

How to repot your plant

Before repotting your plant, make sure you have the necessary materials to repot:

  • Fresh, indoor potting soil

  • If desired, a new bigger pot

  • Sharp, clean shears

When your plant is dry, or before it's next watering, follow these simple instructions:

  1. Remove the plant from its pot. For smaller plants, you can do this by simply turning over the pot and letting the plant slide out. For larger plants, you may need to lift it out while holding the pot to the floor (pro tip: spread newspaper over the floor for easy clean up!). If your plant is difficult to remove from the pot (the roots are twisting out the drainage holes), you may need to simply cut these roots off to get it out.

  2. Shake the soil off the roots, removing about half of the old soil. You may need to gently detangle some of the roots to do this. Don’t panic if some of them rip or break. You may also prune some roots, especially if you are planning on potting it in the same pot as before.

  3. Pour a couple inches of fresh potting soil into the pot and pat down so it’s firm.

  4. Place the plant in the pot and fill with more soil until it’s secure in place and standing straight. Pat down again until firm.

  5. Fill with soil to the top of the pot, but make sure to leave about an inch so that water does not overflow when you water your plant.

  6. Water thoroughly and let the plant completely drain.

Voilà! You’re done. Remember that your plant may be a little unstable the first few weeks in its new pot, so take care when moving it back to its home.


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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

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Treating Scale (And Other Tough Leaf Dwelling Bugs)
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The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

We're advocates for all organic everything - even when it comes to pest control. Unfortunately, sometimes Neem Oil just doesn't cut it. Especially when it comes to Scale. Not sure what Scale is? Let us explain...

Scale insects are small, hard-shelled bugs that appear on leaves and stems and suck out vital nutrients from your plants (yeah, kinda gross). This can cause your plants to lose color, vigor, and in extreme cases, death.

So you've drenched every leaf in Neem Oil but they just won't go away? What next? Rubbing Alcohol.

  • Dab a Q-tip in rubbing alcohol and pick off the scale bugs one by one.

  • Moisten a paper towel or cotton ball and thoroughly wipe down the more infested areas

  • Continue to use Neem Oil at the base of the plant to control Scale growth in the soil.

  • Repeat this once a week for 3-5 weeks, or until you're no longer finding scale on the leaves.

Recovery will take some time, but be optimistic - indoor plants can be surprisingly resilient. Once you've controlled the issue, your plant will thank you with color and life springing back into their foliage!


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BIRD OF PARADISE

A popular indoor plant for creating that instant jungle atmosphere.

3-4ft tall plant with ceramic pot

Late Summer Rotation Reminder
Photo credit:  @minima_organizing

Photo credit: @minima_organizing

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

We hate to even acknowledge it, but summer is winding down (😢). Make the most of these brighter, longer days and give your plants a 180-degree turn. This provides the foliage an even chance to soak up the last of the warm summer sun. You'll have this technique to thank when you see full and even growth come autumn.

*Pro tip*: Give your plants a vitamin boost (aka fertilize) before temperatures cool and growth starts to slow down.


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RUBBER TREE

A unique indoor plant option with dark leaves and crimson colored casings. Easy care and air-purifying.

Trimming Brown Edges Promotes New Growth

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

If you're a first time plant owner, you might be alarmed when seeing browning edges and drying leaves. This is your plant's natural way to express itself! While you make adjustments for its comfort, don't be afraid to give it a makeover. Trimming is completely safe and allows your plant to redirect more energy to new growth. Here are a few simple tips as you prepare those scissors:

  • Check that the blades are clean or disinfect them with rubbing alcohol

  • Trim off whole leaves as close to the root as possible

  • Follow the leaf's natural lines when reshaping edges


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CALATHEA RATTLESNAKE

Named for the unique pattern on its foliage, this prayer plant is also admired for its various colors.

How to Care for and Grow Your Dragon Tree

Dragon Tree

AKA dracaena marginata

A timeless indoor plant with a striking appearance, the Dragon Tree (dracaena marginata) is known for its slender striped leaves that burst out of strong trunks. One of the easiest plants to care for and a fabulous indoor air-purifier, the Dragon Tree requires little maintenance to bring beauty and elegance to any space it graces. Learn how to care for and grow your very own Dragon Tree.

Light

Dragon Trees prefer bright indirect light, though they can adjust to medium to low levels of light. Keep them out of harsh direct sunlight, as too much of it can scorch their leaves.

Water

Let your Dragon Tree dry out between waterings. Water thoroughly when topsoil is dry, usually once a week. Avoid overwatering, and note that your watering schedule may be less frequent during winter months.

Growth

The Dragon Tree is a slow grower, though it is constantly unfolding new leaves and shedding old ones. Indoors, the Dragon Tree can reach up to eight feet tall.

Common problems with Dragon Trees

Leaves falling off

If you see your Dragon Tree leaves falling off, worry not! The Dragon Tree naturally sheds its leaves, so it is not uncommon for you to find them at the base of the soil or on the floor. To avoid them falling to the ground, you may periodically prune your Dragon Tree by simply removing any dead leaves once a week or so. Also consider fertilizing your plant in the spring and summer to make sure there are enough nutrients to go around the many many leaves!

If your Dragon Tree is losing many leaves (think the floor is covered in leaves and/or the plant in general is showing other signs of distress), you may actually have a problem. Check first to make sure you are not overwatering — the soil should dry out in between waterings. Overwatering can lead to more severe ailments and that may eventually require you change the soil.  

Leaves drooping

If you see leaves dropping on your Dragon Tree, it’s very possible you are either overwatering or underwatering. If you suspect it’s underwatering, give your Dragon Tree a thorough shower and let it completely drain out — it should perk up in within 24 hours. If you suspect overwatering, check the soil, particularly at the bottom of the plant. Is there moisture? Let the plant dry out before watering again, and if you expect a case of root rot, you may need to repot the plant with fresh soil.

Leaves turning brown

Are the new leaves of your Dragon Tree turning brown? This could be due to temperature fluctuations. The Dragon Tree does not like drastic temperature changes that could be caused by air vents (AC or heating) or drafts. Make sure your plant is protected from

 

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Dragon Tree

How to care for Dragon tree dracena marginata

Take care of your Dragon Tree and it will take care of you! Below are simple tips to continue caring for your Monstera over time.

  • Pruning - Remove dry or dead leaves all year round, but save any major pruning for the spring and summer months. If you would like to remove an entire stalk or branch of your Dragon Tree, simply cut them off at a 45 degree angle with sharp pruning shears.

  • Cleaning - With so many thin leaves, the Dragon Tree can be difficult to clean! We recommend regularly misting to keep dust off, and occasionally cleaning the leaves with a moist towel.

  • Repotting - Houseplants grow much slower than they would in the wild. Depending on the size of your plant and the density of the roots, this is nice to do every 2-3 years to provide fresh nutrients and encourage new growth.

    • When to repot - If the roots of your Dragon Tree are outgrowing its pot, it will let you know by bulging out at the sides.

    • Pot sizing - if you want your plant to grow taller, find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot. If you want your plant to stay the same height, you can reuse the same pot and simply change the soil. You may need to cut back some of the roots to do this.

    • Get your hands dirty - spread out newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil and pat down firmly. Water the soil thoroughly and place the plant in an area with bright indirect light. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

 

How to propagate a Dragon Tree

The Dragon Tree is a simple plant to propagate. Though there are many ways to do this, water propagation is generally the easiest way to go about it. Follow these instructions to propagate your Dragon Tree:

  • Select a branch or stalk to propagate - Using sharp, clean scissors or shears, cut a branch off your Dragon tree at a 45 degree angle.

  • Place in water - Find a clear glass and fill with water. Make sure only the stem is submerged, and no leaves are sitting in the water.

  • Place in a bright area and wait! - Avoid any direct sun. You may need to change the water out every few days to keep it fresh. It usually takes just a few days for the root to start growing.

  • Transfer to soil - After a few weeks, transfer to indoor potting soil. Depending on the size of the branch and its roots, make sure to choose an appropriate size pot — you do not want an overly large pot for a small cutting or roots.

  • Keep hydrated - During the first few weeks, or until your plant feels firmly rooted in its soil, regularly water and drain your Dragon Tree. The soil should be just barely moist to the touch at all times.


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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

Premium plants paired with stylish ceramics. Order online at leonandgeorge.com

How to Care for and Grow Your Pilea Peperomiodes
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Chinese Money Plant

AKA pilea peperomiodes

The peculiar Pilea Peperomiodes, also known as the Chinese Money Plant or the Friendship Plant, has one of the most unique stories of the houseplant world. Originally hailing from the Himalyan mountains, this plant was brought to Europe by a Swedish missionary, and, being incredibly simple to propagate, was multiplied and passed around from friend to friend. As such, for many years it was very difficult to actually purchase, given that horticulturists did not typically grow it. Luckily that’s no longer the case, and these plants are not only relatively easy to find but also incredibly easy to care for. With just a little light, water, and love, you too can grow— and pass on— the lovely Pilea Peperomiodes!

Light

Pileas are not too picky when it comes to light. They prefer bright indirect light, though they can adjust to medium levels of light and also stand a few hours of direct sunlight.

Water

Let your Pilea dry out between waterings, and water thoroughly when topsoil is dry, usually once a week. Avoid overwatering, and note that your watering schedule may be less frequent during winter months.

Growth

The Pilea can be a pretty fast grower, though its leaves generally remain quite small. In prime conditions, the Pilea can grow over three feet tall.

Common problems with Pileas or Chinese Money Plant

Leaves drooping

It is not uncommon for Pileas’ leaves to droop, and unfortunately there are many different things that cause this. The first thing to check is if the plant is thirsty — if you haven’t watered it in a while, it’s possible that it’s just too dry and has lost its perkiness. Check the soil and if you find this the case (the soil is bone dry), simply give it a good water—ideally in the sink, and even leave it in a bowl with water for a few hours!

Drooping leaves on a Pilea can also be the result of overwatering. Make sure you are only watering when your plant’s soil is dry. If the plant has been severely overwatered, you may have a case of root rot and will need to repot.

Leaves curling

When the Pilea has curling leaves, it most likely is a case of too much sunlight, for example several hours of hot summer sun or strong afternoon sun.

Brown spots

Brown spots, like other issues with the Pilea, can mean many different things. For one, it could mean sunburn—make sure your plant is not getting harsh rays of sunlight for extended periods. Do you fertilize your Pilea? Make sure not to give it more than the recommended dose, as this could lead to fertilizer burn on the plant’s foliage. Finally, and particularly during the winter, make sure your plant isn’t too close to a drafty or freezing window. These plants like moderately warm environments and their leaves will show if exposed to cold temperatures.

White grains on the leaves

Worry not! Pileas develop white grains on their leaves which are simply mineral deposits. You can leave them be, or clean the leaves with a damp cloth.

 

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Pilea Peperomiodes

How to care for and grow pilea peperomiodes chinese money plant.

Take care of your Pilea and it will take care of you! Below are simple tips to continue caring for your Pilea or Chinese Money Plant over time.

  • Pruning & Shaping - Remove dry or dead leaves all year round, but save any major pruning for the spring and summer months. If you would like to modify the shape of your Pilea, simply pinch off any undesired leaves at the base of the stem.

  • Cleaning - The thick leaves of the Pilea can accumulate a lot of dust! Rinse them under the sink when watering, or gently wipe away dust with a wet cloth once every few weeks (this also helps the plant soak in more light!).

  • Repotting - Houseplants grow much slower than they would in the wild. Depending on the size of your plant and the density of the roots, this is nice to do every 2-3 years to provide fresh nutrients and encourage new growth.

    • When to repot - Pileas do not need to be repotted often. Repot with fresh soil once every 1-2 years.

    • Pot sizing - if you want your plant to grow taller, find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot. If you want your plant to stay the same height, you can reuse the same pot and simply change the soil.

    • Get your hands dirty - remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil and pat down firmly. Water the soil thoroughly and place the plant in an area with bright indirect light. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

 

How to propagate a Pilea Peperomiodes

The Pilea is one of the easiest plants to propagate, hence earning itself the name “the friendship plant”, as it is so commonly propagated and passed on from one friend to another. Propagating is very simple, but see our full guide (with images) on how to propagate the Pilea if you need more assistance!

  • Select a stem to propagate - Your Pilea will have one main mother plant and smaller babies that grow at the base of the mother plant. Using sharp, clean scissors or shears, remove one of these babies at the base. This will be the piece you propagate. Don’t have any babies yet? Wait for them to sprout up before propagating!

  • Place in water - Find a clear glass and fill with water. Make sure only the stem is submerged, and no leaves are sitting in the water.

  • Place in a bright area and wait! - Avoid any direct sun. You may need to change the water out every few days to keep it fresh. It usually takes just a few days for the root to start growing.

  • Transfer to soil - After a week or so, transfer to indoor potting soil. A small pot is best — no larger than 6” in diameter.

  • Keep hydrated - During the first few weeks, or until your plant feels firmly rooted in its soil, regularly water and drain your Monstera. The soil should be just barely moist to the touch at all times.


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PILEA PEPEROMIODES

A unique, easy care plant that makes the perfect gift.

Our Favorite Pet-Friendly Plants
Our favorite pet-friendly plants, including air-purifiers and low-light options! Photo credit:  @mintlodica

Our favorite pet-friendly plants, including air-purifiers and low-light options! Photo credit: @mintlodica

Looking for the perfect pet-friendly plant?

If you were worried that your furry friends would limit your indoor plant options, think again! Whether you’re looking for air-purifying plants that are safe for pets, or low-light greenery that will work for both pets and your light conditions, rest assured that there are plenty of options for you to choose from.

The Parlor Palm is a wonderful air-purifying pet-friendly plant.

The Parlor Palm

Most indoor palms are safe for pets, and the Parlor Palm (chamaedora elegans) is no exception. This plant is not only non-toxic, but it also is one of the best air-purifying plants out there! Looking for something bigger? Go for the majestic Kentia Palm — another pet-friendly, air-purifying indoor plant.

 
The Cast Iron Plant is the perfect pet-friendly plant for rooms with little to no light.

The Cast Iron Plant

The Cast Iron Plant (aspidistra elatior) is one of our favorite low-light, pet-friendly plants. Wondering where it gets its name? It isn’t called “cast iron” for nothing— this plant is nearly indestructible and can withstand just about anything, even curious, nibbling pets!

 
The Magenta Triostar is a pet-friendly plant with a lot of color.

The Magenta Triostar

Looking for something with a bit of color? The Magenta Triostar (stromanthe sanguinea triostar) has gorgeous green, white, and magenta colored leaves and is perfectly safe for pets.

 
The Calathea Medallion is a popular indoor plant that is safe for pets.

The Calathea Medallion

A cousin of the Magenta Triostar, the Calathea Medallion (as well as the Calathea Rattlesnake!) are also non-toxic and safe for pets to munch on. Beware, though, before choosing this plant: Calatheas require constant moisture and can be a bit more demanding than some other pet-friendly plants.


 
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The Braided Money Tree

Considered a symbol of good luck and prosperity, the Braided Money Tree is a fantastic pet-friendly plant that comes in many different sizes. Whether it’s the perfect addition to a desktop or shelf, or a larger statement plant for the floor, rest assured that this plant is safe for your pets.

 
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The Bird’s Nest Fern

The Bird’s Nest Fern is a popular non-toxic indoor plant. As far as ferns go, this plant is easy to care for and relatively forgiving of occasional neglect. And if you’re looking for something smaller? In the same family is the Staghorn Fern, also safe for pets.

Is your favorite plant not on this list? Consider how likely your pet will snack on your greenery — most common houseplants are considered just mildly toxic for pets, and would require a fair amount of ingestion to cause a serious health risk. If it’s just a bit of nibbling, there’s most likely nothing to worry about. Shop our full collection of pet-friendly plants here.


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INDOOR PLANTS, potted & DELIVERED

Premium plants paired with stylish ceramics. Order online at leonandgeorge.com

Is Repotting Your Plants an Absolute Must?
Illustration by @kail_bales

Illustration by @kail_bales

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Did you know that repotting your plants isn’t 100% necessary in most cases? That’s right— it’s optional! After researching and testing what works for best for busy city dwellers, here’s our rundown on considerations for optimal indoor plant health.

  • Room for growth - the main reason to consider repotting is to give your plants room for growth. If you start to see roots growing out the drainage holes or circling around the top, potting up to a larger size will allow your plant to grow taller. If you want your plant to stay the same height and shape, you can keep it in its current pot size.

  • Drainage - all plants need drainage so that their roots don’t stay sitting in soggy soil. The plants we buy for our homes are grown in plastic nursery pots that are already pierced for appropriate draining. Many decorative planters that are designed for indoor use don’t have drainage holes, so it’s not advised to repot directly into these.

  • Staging - the method we’ve found that works best for keeping your plants healthy and your home stylish is this one. You can keep your designer ceramics cleaner and your plant comfortable in its nursery pot by simply matching the two to your desired height and finishing the top with a light cover of moss or pebbles. This reduces the amount of shock your plant experiences as it settles into your home and is easier for health checks and proper watering. 

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SNAKE PLANT

A large succulent and thus extremely adaptable and low maintenance – the perfect starter plant. It is also a terrific air purifier, making it a healthy and attractive addition to any indoor space.

Our Favorite Varieties of Snake Plants
The many varieties of snake plants (and all their benefits!).

Looking for the perfect variety of Snake Plant for your home or office?

The Snake Plant, also known as Mother-in-Law’s Tongue or Sansevieria, is a popular indoor plant not only for its elegant, structural beauty, but also for its extreme hardiness, adaptability, and air-purifying power. Learn about the many different varieties of Snake Plants, and which one speaks to you most!

Our favorite Snake Plant varieties.

Sanseviera Laurentii

Not all Snake Plants are created equal, and Sansevieria Laurentii is the proof. In a study performed by Nasa, this Snake Plant variety came out as not only one of the best air-purifying plants among Snake Plants in general, but among houseplants in general as well. Green leaves with bright yellow edges are what make this Snake Plant stand out from the rest.

 
The Sansevieria Trifasciata. Photo by  @plant_wizard .

The Sansevieria Trifasciata. Photo by @plant_wizard.

Sanseveria Trifasciata

Similar to the Laurentii but without the yellow leaves, the Sanseveria Trifasciata is another gorgeous, structural Snake Plant that can survive with little to no light and occasional neglect.

 
The Moonshine Snake Plant. Photo by  @planty_days .

The Moonshine Snake Plant. Photo by @planty_days.

Moonshine Snake Plant

One of our favorite varieties of Snake Plants, the Moonshine Snake Plant boasts unique, sage green leaves. Generally on the shorter side (2-3 feet tall), this plant can be a bit stouter and more robust than its cousins of similar shape and size.

 
The Sansevieria Cylindrica. Photo by  @plantosaurs .

The Sansevieria Cylindrica. Photo by @plantosaurs.

Sanseviera Cylindrica

Like its name implies, the Sanseviera Cylindrica (sometimes also referred to as African Spear) grows tough cylindrical spears from its base. Sometimes braided, and sometimes in form of a star (Sanseviera Cylindrica Starfish), this variety of Snake Plant is, like others, requires very little maintenance to thrive. Though it can survive in low light conditions, bright indirect light is best for this Snake Plant, which will grow its spears towards the light source if not getting enough.


 

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INDOOR PLANTS, potted & DELIVERED

Premium plants paired with stylish ceramics. Order online at leonandgeorge.com

Watering Tips and Tricks
Photo credit:  leonandgeorge.com

Photo credit: leonandgeorge.com

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Watering your plants truly is a simple task, but here are a few quick tips to make elevate your routine to leave your plants happier, healthier, and better looking than ever.

  • Water around the edges of the pot since that's where the roots gather. This makes it easier for your plant to drink and get even saturation.

  • Room temperature water (about 68ºF) is optimum for nutrient absorption and doesn't give your plant the shock of being too hot or too cold.

  • Watering your plants in the morning allows them to stay hydrated during the day, a nice feeling during the summer!


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JUNIOR FIDDLE LEAF FIG TREE

A lush and sculptural plant with elegant violin-shaped leaves, the Junior Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree makes for a dramatic addition to any indoor space – truly a must-have for all who appreciate style and greenery.

3-4ft tall plant with ceramic pot and reclaimed wood stand: $299

How to Propagate Pilea Peperomiodes AKA The Chinese Money Plant
How to propagate the Pilea or Chinese Money Plant with cuttings.

How to propagate the Pilea or Chinese Money Plant with cuttings.

Wondering how to propagate the Pilea to pass on to friends?

Propagation with cuttings is a simple way to multiply your plant, and the Pilea, also known as the Chinese Money Plant or the Friendship Plant, is the perfect candidate! In fact, it gets the nickname “Friendship Plant” because it was traditionally passed on from one friend to another via cuttings. As such, for a long time it was a hard plant to find on the shelves of local plant shops and nurseries. Luckily, that’s no longer the case, which makes it the perfect gift to send to a friend, or get for yourself and pass along cuttings!

How to propagate the Pilea

Step one: Locate small offsets, or baby Pileas, at the base of the plant. You will find these below the main stalk— if you’re plant doesn’t have any, hold off! They will sprout up soon.

Step two: Using a clean blade, cut an offset at the base or closest to the soil as possible.

Step three: Place the stem of the offset in a small glass or jar with water. Make sure only the stem or shoot is submerged — do not submerge any leaves as they will rot (you may need to remove some leaves).

Step four: Place in an area with bright, indirect light and wait. You may like to change the water every few days to keep it fresh. After a week or two, you should see roots begin to sprout.

Step five: Once the roots have grown to about an inch long, carefully place them in a small pot with fresh soil, gently pressing down on the soil once it’s potted. Keep the soil just moist to the touch for the first few weeks until the plant has taken root.

Good luck, happy propagating, and show us your new plant babies by tagging us @leonandgeorge on Instagram!

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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

Order online at leonandgeorge.com