Posts tagged Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree
Watering Tips and Tricks
Photo credit:  leonandgeorge.com

Photo credit: leonandgeorge.com

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Watering your plants truly is a simple task, but here are a few quick tips to make elevate your routine to leave your plants happier, healthier, and better looking than ever.

  • Water around the edges of the pot since that's where the roots gather. This makes it easier for your plant to drink and get even saturation.

  • Room temperature water (about 68ºF) is optimum for nutrient absorption and doesn't give your plant the shock of being too hot or too cold.

  • Watering your plants in the morning allows them to stay hydrated during the day, a nice feeling during the summer!


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JUNIOR FIDDLE LEAF FIG TREE

A lush and sculptural plant with elegant violin-shaped leaves, the Junior Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree makes for a dramatic addition to any indoor space – truly a must-have for all who appreciate style and greenery.

3-4ft tall plant with ceramic pot and reclaimed wood stand: $299

Spider Webs and Mites on Houseplants
Photo credit:  reddit

Photo credit: reddit

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Checked your plant's fronds lately? Asides from watering, dusting and checking for insects from time to time should be part of maintaining your plant's health. Check the undersides of leaves and all the stems. If you spot any thin silky webs, it's likely that a few spider mites have decided to take up residency. Treat the problem ASAP to prevent it from spreading.  

  • Clean off your plant with a sturdy stream of cold water in your sink, shower, or outdoors with a hose. Thoroughly spray the tops and bottoms of leaves and stems to completely wash away all webs, mites, and eggs.

  • Let your plant dry off, then treat the infested areas with a natural pesticide like Neem Oil

  • Repeat this process once a week for three weeks to make sure the mites don't come back

Spider mites appear when conditions are hot and dry. If this is a regular issue for you, try adding humidity and air circulation to your plant's environment. These pesky critters essentially feed on your plants, draw out their nutrients needed to survive, and cause leaves to drop until the plant eventually dies. Luckily, they're easy to control if caught early!


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JUNIOR FIDDLE LEAF FIG BUSH

A lush and sculptural plant with elegant violin-shaped leaves, the Junior Fiddle Leaf Fig Bush makes for a dramatic addition to any indoor space – truly a must-have for all who appreciate style and greenery.

3-4ft tall plant with ceramic pot and reclaimed wood stand: $299

How to Care for and Grow Your Fiddle Leaf Fig
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Fiddle Leaf Fig

AKA ficus lyrata

The Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree, known for its sculptural shape and stick-thin trunk, is arguably the “it” plant of the moment. If you are not familiar yet, you will be soon: this incredibly gorgeous tree, which also comes in bush or columnar form, appears in magazines, design blogs, and all over Instagram. But despite the popularity, the Fiddle Leaf Fig is not necessarily the easiest of plants to take care of. It is notoriously finicky, and is known to drop leaves with even the most minimal change in its watering schedule, temperature, or environment. Worth it? We think so. Read on for simple tips on how to care for and grow the Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree.

Light

Water

  • Water thoroughly when topsoil is dry, usually once every ten days or so. Avoid overwatering.

  • Watering schedule may be less frequent during winter months

Growth

  • In prime conditions, the Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree is a fast grower and can grow up to 10 feet tall indoors

  • Most growth occurs during spring and summer

Common problems with Fiddle Leaf Fig Trees

Yellow or brown leaves - overwatering

How to fix your fiddle leaf fig
  • Symptom - leaves turning yellow or brown, usually starting at the center of the leaf

  • Cause - overwatering and/or not enough sunlight

  • Remedy - allow soil to dry out completely, sometimes this can take 2-3 weeks. Check the soil’s moisture through the drainage holes at the bottom. Overwatering can lead to more severe ailments and that may eventually require you change the soil.  

Yellow or brown leaves - underwatering

  • Symptom - leaves turning yellow or brown, usually starting at the edge of the leaf

  • Cause - underwatering

  • Remedy - give your plant a full shower! Take it out of its decorative pot and put in a bathtub, shower or outdoor area and give it a thorough watering. You may even let it sit in water for a few hours so that the roots can drink from the bottom. Let it drain out completely before returning it to its decorative pot.

Leaf drop - overwatering or underwatering

  • Symptom - leaves dropping, either at the bottom of the plant or from all areas of the plant

  • Cause - usually overwatered fiddles will drop their bottom leaves, while underwatered fiddles will drop leaves from anywhere on the plant.

  • Remedy - follow instructions above for either overwatered or underwatered Fiddle Leaf Fig plants!

Leaf droop - underwatered or too warm

  • Symptom - leaves sagging or drooping

  • Cause - fiddles will sometimes begin to droop if it’s warm and they are thirsty

  • Remedy - adjust your watering schedule. During warm summer months, your plant may need more frequent waterings.

Is this all very confusing? Fiddles are known for that. Read more about how to tell the difference between overwatering and underwatering, where you should place your Fiddle for best results, and the ultimate guide to watering a Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree.

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Fiddle Leaf Fig

How to care for fiddle leaf fig

Take care of your Fiddle Leaf Fig and it will take care of you! Below are simple tips to continue caring for your Fiddle Leaf Fig over time.

  • Pruning - Remove dry or dead leaves all year round, but save any major pruning for the spring and summer months. It is not uncommon for fiddles to grow like crazy toward the light (especially if you don’t rotate them!), and if this is the case, you may want to prune it back. When pruning your Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree, wear gloves and protect your floor with newspaper — the sap that leaks out can be sticky and damage floors. Use sharp, clean shears and cut just above the node at a 90 degree angle.

  • Cleaning - Take a damp cloth or sponge and gentle clean each leaf (this also helps the plant soak in more light!).

  • Repotting - Houseplants grow much slower than they would in the wild. Depending on the size of your plant and the density of the roots, this is nice to do every 2-3 years to provide fresh nutrients and encourage new growth.

    • When to repot - if the roots start to become visible outside the soil (i.e. circling around the grow pot), it is time to consider repotting your Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree.

    • Pot sizing - if you want your plant to grow taller, find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot. If you want your plant to stay the same height, you can reuse the same pot and simply change the soil.

    • Get your hands dirty - spread out newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil and pat down firmly. Water the soil thoroughly and place the plant in an area with bright indirect light. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

How to propagate a Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree

Whether you want to recycle your Fiddle Leaf Fig Cuttings cuttings or you simply want to create a new plant, propagating the Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree is relatively simple. Though there are many ways to do this, water propagation is generally the easiest way to go about it. Follow these instructions to propagate your Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree:

How to propagate a fiddle leaf fig
  • Select a small branch to propagate - Using sharp, clean scissors or shears, cut a two to three inch branch just above a node (a leaf joint). Do not cut a branch off with more than three leaves— it will require too much energy to grow roots.

  • Place in water - Find a clear glass and fill with water. Make sure only the stem of the branch is submerged, and no leaves are sitting in the water. You may like to use a rooting hormone to increase your chances of rooting.

  • Place in a bright area and wait! - Avoid any direct sun. You may need to change the water out every few days to keep it fresh. It could take up to several weeks for your cutting to form roots.

  • Transfer to soil - After some time, you will start to see tiny white roots emerging from the cutting. Give it a few more days until the roots have grown, and then transfer to indoor potting soil. A small pot is best — no larger than 6” in diameter.

  • Keep hydrated - During the first few weeks, or until your plant feels firmly rooted in its soil, regularly water and drain your plant. The soil should be just barely moist to the touch at all times.


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Indoor plants, potted & delivered

Premium plants paired with stylish pots. Order online at leonandgeorge.com

Sun exposure and leaf burn
Photo by  @renoplantmom

Photo by @renoplantmom

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

In most parts of the country, summer means one thing: More sun! While we're typically out playing in it, our plants are sometimes burning in it. With the sun being at its closest to earth during these next few months, be sure to take notice of how your plants are reacting. Here are a few tips:

  • Sunspots - Look out for white spots or dry brown splotches in random areas of a leaf. This is a clear indicator of sunburn. Sadly, the leaf won't repair itself but you can trim the areas or the entire leaf off.

  • Reposition - On extremely bright days, move your plants a few feet away from their normal sunny perches or draw the shades to give them a chance to recover and cool.

  • Humidity - direct light + dry air is a setting your plant up to burn. Add a humidifier or mist your plants regularly to protect their beautiful and delicate foliage from sunburn.

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FIDDLE LEAF FIG TREE

A lush and sculptural plant with elegant violin-shaped leaves.

Time to Rotate Your Houseplants
Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree growing towards its light source.

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

This week’s reminder is to give your plant a gentle 180° turn. Plants tend to grow brighter and bushier foliage on the side that is reaching for light. Give both sides of your plant their moment in the sun and you'll see more balanced growth.

Rotate your plants back to their better side when guests come over, but we recommend letting your lopsided foliage even out for about a month before turning back.

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FIDDLE LEAF FIG TREE

A lush and sculptural plant with elegant violin-shaped leaves.

Diagnosing and Treating Root Rot in Fiddle Leaf Fig Plants
Diagnosing and treating root rot in fiddle leaf fig plants.

A post by resident plant expert Claire Akin of the Fiddle Leaf Fig Plant Resource.

It typically starts as brown spots on the leaves that begin spreading, before the leaves drop. Root rot is a serious problem in fiddle leaf figs that will kill the plant if it’s not treated quickly, so it’s important to act fast before your plant has suffered too much damage.

What Causes Root Rot

Root rot is caused by too much moisture in the soil due to overwatering. Fiddle leaf fig roots need oxygen to live, they should be kept slightly moist but never wet. Many plant owners who are anxious to take good care of their new plants water them too often, causing the roots to sit in water and drown.

How to Diagnose Root Root in a Fiddle Leaf Fig

Even a fiddle leaf fig that appears to be relatively dry on the surface can be suffering from root rot underneath, depending on the type of soil, the size of the container, and the drainage. The only way to know for sure is to remove the root ball from the pot to inspect.

In this case, when we inspected the root ball of a fiddle leaf fig with signs of root rot, we found a soggy wet mess. You can see from these photos the classic symptoms of root rot on the leaves. The plant’s owner had also noticed the plant dropping several leaves. She wasn’t sure what was going on beneath the surface, so she took the plant out of its pot and inspected the roots.


The root ball was completely wet, dripping water when she removed it from the pot. The drainage that she thought was adequate was not, even with a week between waterings, the soil was not drying out at all. Sections of the roots were brown and mushy, as the infection spread through the roots and up to the leaves of the plant.

How to Save Your Fiddle Leaf Fig from Root Rot

The best way to save your fiddle leaf fig from root rot is to recognize the signs quickly and act fast. Remove your plant from its pot and take a look at the root ball. Is it wet? Are the roots sitting in moisture? Are they turning brown and mushy? If so, you’ll want to take action.

Rinse off the root ball and inspect the roots. Remove any that are brown or mushy with a sharp pair of pruning shears. Then, start from scratch with a container with excellent drainage and a fast-draining soil. Consider adding some gravel or packing peanuts to the bottom of your container to improve the drainage and act as a ballast to keep your plant’s root ball dry.

Be sure to choose a container that isn’t too large for your plant. Large containers can retain too much water and take too long to dry out between waterings. The ideal container is just 4 to 6 inches larger in diameter than the container your plant arrived in.

You’ll also want to make sure that your plant is getting enough light. Even fiddle leaf figs that have adequate drainage can suffer from root rot if they’re not getting enough light.

Repot your fiddle leaf fig with fresh potting soil in the well-draining container. Then, water once and make sure the excess water is draining out of the bottom of the container. After that, wait. Do not water again until you’re sure the roots have had a chance to dry out.

It may be more than a week before the roots have a chance to dry, depending on the size of your plant, how much sunlight it gets, and the configuration of your container. You can use a moisture meter to check the bottom of the root ball to see how wet it is. Don’t water until you get a reading of 4 or lower at the root level.

Resume watering once a week or less and your plant should stabilize. You can remove the damaged leaves with sharp pruning shears, taking care not to remove more than 10% of the total leaves at once. Given enough time and TLC, your plant can make a full recovery.


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About Claire

Claire Akin is a Fiddle Leaf Fig lover and created the Fiddle Leaf Fig Resource to share what she's learned about growing healthy and vibrant plants. She even created her own fertilizer specific to the needs of Fiddles! Learn all you'll ever need to know about these gorgeous plants at fiddleleaffigplant.com

 

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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

Premium plants paired with stylish ceramic pots. Order online at leonandgeorge.com

How Can You Tell the Difference Between a Dry and Over Watered Fiddle Leaf Fig Plant?
How can you tell the difference between a dry and overwatered fiddle leaf fig

A post by resident plant expert Claire Akin of the Fiddle Leaf Fig Plant Resource.

The two most common problems for fiddle leaf fig plants are ironically the opposite: too much and too little water. But what’s worse is that it’s actually tough to tell which is which. Over watering leads to root rot, a fungal condition that kills the plant’s roots and leaves. Under watering leads to a dry plant with leaf damage.

First, one clarification. Over watering and lack of sunlight work together to produce root rot, so if your fiddle leaf fig doesn’t get enough sun (and they like lots of light), the symptoms may mimic those of too much water. Under watering and too much sun work together to dry out and burn your plant, so you’ll want to treat those issues together.

But how do you know for sure if your plant is too wet or too dry? At first look, brown spots, dropping leaves, and curled edges can be a symptom of both conditions. Here are the subtle differences between an over watered and under watered fiddle leaf fig plant.

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Symptoms of a Dry Fiddle Leaf Fig Plant

There are a few ways you can discern a dry plant from an over watered plant. First, chronically dry plants will always have brown spots and curled leaves. You can see this extreme example of leaf curling for a plant that was completely dried beyond repair.

But what’s different about the brown spots of a dry plant is that they’ll typically start at the edge of the leaf, not in the middle. They’ll also affect leaves all over the plant, from top to bottom, where root rot will usually affect the lower leaves more than the top leaves.

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Finally, the leaves of your dry fiddle leaf fig may look otherwise healthy, whereas the leaves of a plant with root rot will begin to look sickly, yellow, or have tiny brown spots. Both cases will drop leaves, but dry plants will drop leaves throughout the plant, not just the bottom leaves.

 

 

 

Symptoms of Root Rot in a Fiddle Leaf Fig Plant

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The telltale sign of too much water and not enough sunlight is that your plant will start to get brown spots in the middle of the leaf, as well as at the edges. You may also see a yellowing of the leaves before they fall off. Yellow almost always means too much water and not enough sun or fertilizer.

Overwatered plants will get tiny brown spots or brown shaded areas on their leaves before they turn to brown spots, like you can see in this example.

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You will also notice that with root rot, the plant will drop its lowest leaves first. A plant’s instinct is to protect the newest growth (which has more access to sunlight in the wild) and drop the older leaves that it doesn’t need as much. You can see in this image a plant with root rot that has lost many of its lower leaves.

At first glance, it may be tough to determine whether you are giving your plant too much or too little water, but the things to look out for to diagnose root rot are yellowing leaves, brown spots in the middle of the leaf, and dropping the lowest leaves.

If you’re still not sure, try using a moisture meter to check the water in your plant. Read how to use a moisture meter with your fiddle leaf fig here.

Could it Be Erratic Watering?

Does your plant have symptoms of both over and underwatering? There’s a chance it could be both, or a condition called erratic watering.

The trick to solving this problem is to remove all of the leaves damaged by root rot (you can leave mildly damaged dry leaves), then setting a schedule and watering your plant only once a week. Water until 10% to 15% of the water comes out your pot’s drainage holes. Wait a full week and check to make sure the top inch of soil is dry before you water again.

For more information on how to water your fiddle leaf fig, read the ultimate watering guide for fiddle leaf figs here. Best of luck in solving your plant’s problems!


About Claire

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Claire Akin is a Fiddle Leaf Fig lover and created the Fiddle Leaf Fig Resource to share what she's learned about growing healthy and vibrant plants. She even created her own fertilizer specific to the needs of Fiddles! Learn all you'll ever need to know about these gorgeous plants at fiddleleaffigplant.com

 

 

 

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Fiddle leaf fig fertilizer

Plant food specially formulated for the fiddle leaf fig, encouraging new growth, strong roots, and a healthy shine.

How to Prune a Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree
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So you want to prune your fiddle leaf fig

There are many reasons you may consider pruning your fiddle leaf fig tree. Perhaps it has grown lopsided over the last several months, and you haven’t rotated it once since it graced you with its presence. It could be that some leaves have developed unattractive brown spots and you’re considering removing these damaged and possibly infected areas. Or maybe you just have a very happy tree that, with so much new growth, is about to hit the ceiling. Whatever the case, know that pruning a fiddle leaf fig is actually quite simple and nothing to be afraid of. Follow these simple tips on how to prune a fiddle leaf fig tree and you will enjoy this structural beauty for years to come.

The benefits of pruning

Just like we cut our hair or groom our pets, our indoor plants need an occasional trim as well. Not only does this generally improve their appearance, but it also contributes to the plant’s overall health. Some benefits of pruning your fiddle may include:

  • Space - In prime conditions, fiddle leaf figs can grow like crazy and you may notice your fiddle becoming “crowded”. Cutting down some leaves and branches will allow better airflow for your plant.

  • Sickness- If some leaves are developing brown spots or signs of illness, prune these areas immediately. Not only does your plant use a lot of energy to treat these distressed areas, but these leaves could infect others nearby and spread quickly all over the plant.

  • Shape- Whether your tree has uneven growth or you’d simply like to improve its shape, pruning your tree can help you attain that picture-perfect look you’ve been longing for!

Photo credit:  General Store

Photo credit: General Store

The best time of year to prune

Light trimming and removal of dead or dry leaves is fine all year long. However, if you’re planning on doing major reshaping or removal of larger stems or branches, it’s best to wait until spring or early summer. Most indoor plants go dormant during the winter, and shorter days mean less light for your plant. Cutting them back during this time not only risks shocking them but also makes it harder for them to heal and form new growth. That’s why the best time of year to prune is during the spring or early summer. And when pruning, remember! Never remove more than 10% of your plant at a time.

How to prune your fiddle leaf fig

Before getting started, here’s what you’ll need:

  • A sharp pair of clean shears

  • Damp tissue

  • Newspaper or other material to protect your floors

It is important that your shears are clean— you are essentially cutting a wound into the tree and can infect it if your tools are not clean. And while we’re on that topic, keep in mind that the sap from fiddle trees’ branches can damage your floor, so take care when cutting!

Once you’ve determined the areas you’d like to prune, locate a spot on the branch between two nodes (the part of the branch from which leaves emerge), and cut at an angle. Dab the area you cut with a damp tissue or towel — this will help speed up the healing process.

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What to expect after pruning

If your plant is in good health, the branches that you pruned will eventually split into two and form new leaves. And what to do with the branches you removed? Try your hand at propagation! Put them in a glass or bottle with water, making sure there is room for the cutting to breathe. After four to six weeks, the branch should form new roots, at which point you can plant in well-draining indoor potting soil.

Good luck, we believe in you!


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Indoor plants, potted & delivered.

Premium plants paired with stylish ceramics. Order online at leonandgeorge.com

Fiddle Leaf Figs and Their Brown Spots
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The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

It's no surprise that the the Fiddle Leaf Fig has risen to the top of the most wanted indoor plant list, with its structural leaves and ability to transform almost any space into the likes of a magazine shoot. These big bold beauties can be picky though, and most owners experience brown spots despite perfect maintenance routines and all the sweet talking they can muster. Read on for the three most common causes.

  • Overwatering - Darker brown spots around leaf edges and centers will form from getting too much water. Overwatering and keeping the soil moist will cause the roots to rot and can lead to fungal infections. Check under your plant for drainage and standing water ASAP. Allow soil to dry completely through between waterings. In extreme cases, change out the soil.

  • Dryness - Light brown spots (as pictured) will form around the edges of leaves from a lack of water, or too much direct light. A bright spot next to the window, but not in the path of harsh direct sunlight or any heat source is best. Refresh your tree by giving it a thorough shower, letting the water run through the drainage holes. When time to water again, add 1/2 cup to your typical amount and check every 5-7 days to see how fast your plant is drinking and drying.

  • Insect Damage - small dark spots that eventually turn into holes, this type of browning can often be found on new growth. Luckily, this isn't very common and is easy to treat. Look out for insects or webs on the undersides of the leaves. Spray both sides of the leaves and along the stem with Neem Oil, a natural fungicide that kills bugs, larvae, and eggs. Wait two weeks, inspect for further evidence of insects, and repeat if necessary.


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FIDDLE LEAF FIG TREE

A lush and sculptural plant with elegant violin-shaped leaves, the Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree makes for a dramatic addition to any indoor space – truly a must-have for all who appreciate style and greenery.

6-7ft tall plant with ceramic pot and reclaimed wood stand: $599

Delivery in SF & LA included

Our plant doctor’s most frequently asked questions, answered
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The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Did you know that Léon & George plant purchases come with lifetime access to our virtual plant doctor service? Here are the top three questions our customers are asking, questions that may have been on your own list!

  • I have direct light, is that good? What does bright light mean? - Direct light is wonderful, but for indoor plants, only a few can handle the intensity from uncovered South or West facing windows (ex. Snake Plants, Bird of Paradise). Bright light for indoor plants is ideally a spot that is 1-3 feet away from a window. 

  • I should fertilize, right? What brand of fertilizer do you recommend? - Fertilizer is like a vitamin supplement for your plant babies, and should be measured carefully. Use during spring & summer to give your plants more energy for growing. We don't have a brand in particular that we recommend, but we do always dilute our fertilizers beyond what's prescribed on the label. 

  • My plant has minor brown spots/holes. Is that bad? - Typically, no! Plants are living organisms with natural imperfections, just like us. Each plant will grow in its own manner and not always have perfect leaves and vines. Minor brown spots and holes are natural - we like to think of them as freckles :) If you notice major browning or holes, then this could be a sign of needing to adjust your care. The first things to check are: watering habits, sun exposure, and bug infestation. 

Try making small adjustments when troubleshooting with plants, and monitor any changes over a few weeks before making other adjustments. Our plants are playing the long game, and sometimes take a while to adjust to new routines. 


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JUNIOR FIDDLE LEAF FIG TREE

A lush and sculptural plant with elegant violin-shaped leaves, the Junior Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree makes for a dramatic addition to any indoor space – truly a must-have for all who appreciate style and greenery.

4ft tall plant with ceramic pot and reclaimed wood stand: $299

Delivery in SF & LA included

Plant Care Tip #26: Stay Calm
Photo credit:  @leighkiyoko

Photo credit: @leighkiyoko

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Life happens, even to our living house plants.

If you just bought a houseplant and it drops a leaf...
Stay calm
If the tips of the leaves are turning yellow or brown...
Stay calm
If there's a leaf or two with holes...
Stay calm

Make small measured adjustments to your plant's access to light, OR it's watering schedule OR the temperature in its space, OR give it insect repellent, then sit back and wait.

Plants react to adjustments with delay. Give any changes you're making at least 1-2 weeks to see results. Don't move your plant 3 times in one week, or suddenly double its water. Plants can be extremely resilient and adaptable if given the chance!

Stay calm, be patient, and enjoy as nature works its healing magic.
 

Our plant doctors are available 24/7 for any questions about keeping your plants happy and healthy! Email us anytime plantdoctor@leonandgeorge.com


Indoor Plant Inspiration

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JUNIOR FIDDLE LEAF FIG BUSH

A lush and sculptural plant with elegant violin-shaped leaves, the Junior Fiddle Leaf Fig Bush makes for a dramatic addition to any indoor space – truly a must-have for all who appreciate style and greenery.

3-4ft tall plant with ceramic pot and reclaimed wood stand: $299
Delivery in SF & LA included

Plant Care Tip #11: What To Do About Leaf Drop
Photo by Léon & George

Photo by Léon & George

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

Houseplants drop leaves for many reasons, but most are related to one of the following mishaps in care or growing conditions.

Water: either too much or too little watering, getting on a consistent schedule with your plants is important.

Dry air: tropical plants prefer humid environments and if the air is too dry, they may drop leaves to show their discomfort. Use a humidifier or mister to add moisture to the air.

Fertility: lack of sufficient nutrients - usually you’ll notice leaves lighter in color first, so you have a chance to correct this before leaves drop by adding a small amount of diluted fertilizer.           

Chilling: tropical plants are sensitive to low temperatures - plants on windowsills or in the way of air drafts may get cold and drop leaves     

Often, slight adjustments to your plant’s conditions is all that’s needed. Occasional leaf drop is okay as sometimes our plants need to focus their energy on new growth so shedding the odd, unhealthy leaves is normal.

Our plant doctors are available 24/7 for any questions about keeping your plants happy and healthy. Email us anytime plantdoctor@leonandgeorge.com