Insect Control
Before and after of Pothos being watered

The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

It's fall, everything is cold, and our plants aren't drying out as quickly in between waterings. Increased moisture in our plant's soil is dangerous for a handful of reasons, but maybe none more annoying and frustrating than insects. Specifically, flying insects like gnats and mosquitos. While typically harmless, these pesky flyers can do serious damage to the roots of plants if the infestation goes uncontrolled. Follow these quick and easy steps to prevent and treat any infestations this fall, winter, and beyond!

  • Most pests lay their eggs in damp soil. Allowing the soil to dry between waterings is key to prevention.

  • If pests arrive, start watering from the bottom up to prevent top layers of soil from being too wet.

  • Use Neem Oil, a soap and water mixture, or any other organic insect repellent at first sight of bugs. Thoroughly cover leaves, stems, and the first two inches of soil in order to drench all bugs and prevent larvae in the soil from hatching. This method typically takes multiple applications in order to be successful.

  • As a last resort, systemic insect control granules are effective for protecting and ridding your plants of pests over time. #plantcare #plantlove #leonandgeorge


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CASCADING POTHOS

An easy-care planta with smooth and leathery heart-shaped leaves.

1 ½ft tall with ceramic & wood stand: $139

Real Plants, Real People: Julia & Her Valencia Street Pad
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Julia lived in her perch above Valencia Street for seven years before taking off to London for a new adventure. Just before the big move, she remembers what inspired her to make this place her home.

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How did you know this home was for you?

I remember I had to dash out of a mid-afternoon meeting to view the apartment. The main building was still under construction, so I had to duck under a tarp to get in. Needless to say it wasn’t a perfect start! But when I entered the apartment and took one look at the huge windows and the view of Sutro Tower overlooking Valencia Street, I knew it needed to be my new home. Having just ended a 9-year relationship, this was my first-ever “big girl” apartment - living on my own, completely free to do things exactly as I wanted. It was luxuriously freeing.

Julia’s plant care motto: leave them alone.

Julia’s plant care motto: leave them alone.

What inspires you when you decorate?

So many things inspire my taste! The record that’s on at my local coffee shop, Four Barrell, in the morning. A stack of old books at the barber shop I pass on my way to work. In the case of my living room interior, I was very inspired by a version of the Life Aquatic movie poster and mimicked the colors and tone when painting and decorating. Plus I’m a bit of a globe freak and have a small collection of antique ones in various shades and versions of the USSR.

Julia looks for low-maintenance when it comes to houseplants, like the ultra-hardy  Pothos .

Julia looks for low-maintenance when it comes to houseplants, like the ultra-hardy Pothos.

What are your plant care secrets?

Leave them alone (some) and sing to them (all).

Six Secrets of Scandinavian Design (And How to Use Them)
Characteristics of Scandinavian interior design

Scandinavian interior design: elevating your everyday

When it comes to interior design, it’s no secret that the Scandinavians know what they’re doing. Marked by simplicity and pureness in both form and function, Scandinavian interior design exists to make everyday living beautiful and inspiring with decluttered spaces, bright, neutral tones, and plenty of nature (think wood floors and indoor greenery!). Learn all about the major principles of Scandinavian interior design, and you’ll see quickly see what all the hygge is about!

Basic characteristics of Scandinavian interior design

  1. Minimalism reigns

    Scandinavian design is all about clean, airy spaces and a definitive lack of clutter, allowing light and air to flow freely throughout. Proper organization is key if you want to attain this look, and the items that are on display are simple, functional, and boast beautiful silhouettes.

  2. Muted tones and soft textures

    Something you see time and again with Scandinavian design is the use of muted, neutral colors like white, gray, and beige. That said, it is not uncommon to see a pop of color or patterned textile here and there, so don’t be afraid to incorporate a bright red or yellow to add a bit of personality.

Photo by  @thistlegrass

Photo by @thistlegrass

3. Form AND Function

Functionality is an important element in Nordic design — a beautiful piece of furniture is nothing if it does not serve a functional purpose (or two)! Open living spaces that can serve multiple purposes are key, and tables or sofas often serve as storage units as well. Even the smallest everyday details, like a kettle or throw, are not just functional, but also beautiful and well-designed (yes, you do have permission to splurge on a small item that brings you joy!).

4. Bright spaces and natural light

Scandinavian design is all about letting the light in — sparse or no window dressings and white walls help create the feeling of brightness. And in a region known for its long, harsh winters, it’s no wonder why! Say goodbye to heavy or gaudy curtains, and keep windows free of clutter.

5. Hygge, or coziness, as a way of life

Hygge (pronounced hyoo-guh), a Danish word describing the feeling of coziness and well-being, is not just a driving factor for Scandinavian aesthetics: it’s also a way of life. Thanks to the long, harsh winters of this region, living spaces act as sanctuaries during much of the year. Combined with the bright, airy space of Scandinavian style, you’ll also see plenty of soft, textured blankets, high-quality ceramics (for all the warm beverages!), and candles galore.

6. Inspiration drawn from nature

Perhaps our most favorite aspect of Scandinavian interiors is the deep appreciation for nature. Things like large windows that give way to trees and sky, plenty of indoor potted plants, the use of natural materials, and an eco-friendly, sustainable approach to all aspects of decor make Scandinavian interior design something to swoon about.

Have a style crush yet? Shop our new collection of Scandinavian ceramic plant sets and let us help you bring nature (and hygge) into your home!


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How to Choose the Right Plants for Your Space
How to choose the right plants for your space

Finding the perfect indoor plant can be overwhelming.

With so many options out there and so many considerations to make, choosing the right plant for your space can seem daunting. Do you have the right light conditions for the plant you’ve been eyeing? What if you have pets or small children — are some of these dangerous to have within their reach? What is the look you are going for, or what size should you get? We believe plants and people belong together and we’re here to help make every step of the process as easy as possible: read our tips on how to find the perfect plants for your style and space!

The perfect environment = a thriving plant

The most important thing to first consider when choosing a plant for your home or office is the light. Certain plants, like the popular Fiddle Leaf Fig, absolutely require tons of bright indirect light. Be realistic about your light situation (see our light guide if you aren’t sure!), and make sure you choose a plant that fits the kind of light you have in your space. On our website, you can filter plants by bright, medium, and low light.

Plants that match your lifestyle

Consider how involved you will be in your plant care routine. Some plants, like Calatheas, are more demanding than others, which means they are not a great choice for individuals who travel frequently or are forgetful plant parents. Other plants, like Snake Plants or Zanzibar Gems, can go weeks without watering and are generally very low-maintenance. Check the care instructions of the plant first to make sure it’s something that matches what you’re looking for in terms of maintenance.

Creating a look you love

If you fill your home with plants it will undoubtedly look like a jungle, but you don’t necessarily need dozens of plants to create this look! Consider what look you are going for, and curate from there. Lush greenery like the Elephant Ear or Bird of Paradise create tropical vibes, while the Monstera Deliciosa has a retro feel and the Fiddle Leaf Fig or Rubber Tree a classic look. Go for one large statement plant, or group a few different plants of differing heights together.

Other considerations

Curious pets at home? There are plenty of pet-safe options, though do keep in mind that unless your pet is likely to consume quite a bit of the plant, you probably don’t need to worry too much about your plant being pet-safe.

Alternatively, you may be looking for plants that work well in certain rooms of your home. Check out our favorite plants for the bedroom or bathroom, and see why these are great choices for these specific spaces.

Still need help?

Reach out and let us help you create your oasis! Email us anytime at hello@leonandgeorge.com.


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Premium plants paired with stylish pots, plus lifetime plant care support. Order online at leonandgeorge.com

How to Care for and Grow Your Pink Rubber Tree

Pink Rubber Tree

AKA ficus elastica ruby

How to care for and grow the Pink Rubber Tree

A gorgeous variegated version of the burgundy Rubber Tree, the strawberry-colored leaves of the Pink Rubber Tree make this plant a unique addition to any indoor space. But like so many variegated plants, the Pink Rubber Tree can be slightly more sensitive and requires the right balance of light and humidity to thrive. Read on for simple care instructions for the Pink Rubber Tree, including light requirements, watering frequency, and how to troubleshoot common problems you may encounter along the way.

Light

Pink Rubber Trees prefer plenty of bright indirect light, though they can also adjust to medium indirect light as well. Keep out of harsh direct sunlight as this may scorch their leaves.

Water

The Pink Rubber Tree likes to dry out between waterings — water whenever the top two inches of soil are dry, or about once a week to 10 days. Avoid overwatering, and note that your watering schedule may be less frequent during winter months.

Growth

During the spring and summer is when the Pink Rubber Tree usually grows the most. It can grow up to eight feet tall indoors.

Common problems with Pink Rubber Trees

Yellow leaves on Pink Rubber Tree

Yellow or pale leaves

Yellow leaves on a Pink Rubber Tree can be common. Keep in mind if it’s just one yellow leaf here and there (and it may drop off the plant), it most likely is just an older leaf that’s on its way out. However, if there are many yellow leaves, particularly at the bottom of the plant, this could be a sign of overwatering. Make sure the top soil of your plant is dry before watering, and also look at the roots to make sure it’s not waterlogged.

If the leaves are pale or not that “pink”, this could be a sign of the plant not getting enough light or warmth. Pink Rubber Trees, like most ficus, do not like changes in temperature or cold drafts. They also do best with loads of bright indirect light.

Brown edges

Brown edges on a Pink Rubber Tree leaf usually indicate underwatering, though like many plant issues, there could be other reasons! First, rule out that your plant is not underwatered. One way of quickly assessing the water situation if you are unsure is to lift your plant up. If it feels lighter than you’d expect, it may be very thirsty! Check the soil with your finger — if it’s bone dry, that’s another sign your plant needs a bit more water. If your plant definitely does not seem underwatered, it could also be overwatered, again check the soil, as well as the roots, for accumulated moisture.

Brown edges on Pink Rubber Plant

Dropping leaves

Pink Rubber Trees like other ficus can be sensitive to change, and it is not uncommon for this plant to drop leaves after being moved. Your plant may also drop leaves if it is subject to temperature changes or drafts. Make sure your plant is moved away from air vents, heaters, or windows with cold air drafts.

 

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Pink Rubber Tree

Take care of your Pink Rubber Tree and it will take care of you! Below are simple tips to continue caring for your Pink Rubber Tree over time.

  • Pruning - Remove occasional dry or dead leaves all year round, but save any major pruning for the spring and summer months. When pruning your Pink Rubber Tree, wear gloves and protect your floor with newspaper — the sap that leaks out can be sticky and damage floors. Use sharp, clean shears and cut just above the node at a 90 degree angle.

  • Cleaning - Take each leaf between two soft tissue cloths and wipe off the top to reveal a healthy shine. Do this at least once a month to keep away pests and help the plant soak in more light!

  • Repotting - Houseplants grow much slower than they would in the wild. Depending on the size of your plant and the density of the roots, this is nice to do every 2-3 years to provide fresh nutrients and encourage new growth.

    • When to repot - if the roots start to become visible outside the soil, it is time to consider repotting.

    • Pot sizing - if you want your plant to grow taller, find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot. If you want your plant to stay the same height, you can reuse the same pot and simply change the soil.

    • Get your hands dirty - spread out newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil and pat down firmly. Water the soil thoroughly and place the plant in an area with bright indirect light. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

 

How to propagate a Pink Rubber Tree

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There are many ways to do propagate Pink Rubber Trees, but water propagation is generally the easiest way to go about it. Follow these instructions to propagate your Pink Rubber Tree:

  • Select a small branch to propagate - Using sharp, clean scissors or shears, cut a two to three inch branch just above a node (a leaf joint) of your Rubber Tree.

  • Place in water - Find a clear glass and fill with water. Make sure only the stem of the branch is submerged, and no leaves are sitting in the water.

  • Place in a bright area and wait! - Avoid any direct sun. If desired, change the water out every few days to keep it fresh. It could take up to several weeks for your cutting to form roots.

  • Transfer to soil - After some time, you will start to see tiny white roots emerging from the cutting. Give it a few more days until the roots have grown, and then transfer to indoor potting soil. A small pot is best — no larger than 6” in diameter.

  • Keep moist - During the first few weeks, or until your plant feels firmly rooted in its soil, regularly water and drain your plant. The soil should be just barely moist to the touch at all times. Once it is rooted, you can begin to water less frequently, whenever the topsoil is dry to the touch.

Illustrations by our talented plant stylist, Kailie Barnes.


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How to Care for and Grow Your Cast Iron Plant

Cast Iron Plant

AKA aspidistra elatior

How to care for and grow the Cast Iron Plant

Beautifully lush and tougher than nails, the Cast Iron Plant is a favorite houseplant for its deep green foliage and easy care vibes. Learn the basics of Cast Iron plant care including light requirements, watering frequency, and how to troubleshoot common problems you may encounter along the way.

Light

Cast Iron Plants thrive in dim, drafty spaces. Your plant will do just fine in bright indirect light, but keep it out of direct sunlight as it may scorch the leaves.

Water

The Cast Iron Plant likes even moisture at all times. Water it once or twice a week to maintain the soil just moist to the touch. Avoid overwatering, and note that your watering schedule may be less frequent during winter months.

Growth

The Cast Iron Plant is a slow grower, not showing too much growth over time. It will grow up to two feet tall and two to three feet wide.

Common problems with Cast Iron Plants

Leaves turning yellow on Cast Iron Plant

Leaves turning yellow or brown

If you see yellow or brown leaves on your Cast Iron Plant, the most likely cause is either waterlogged soil (while these plants like to remain evenly moist, they do not like soggy soil), or your plant is getting too much light. Avoid direct light, and make sure you are not overwatering your plant.

In the meantime, remove any damaged leaves by simply cutting with clean scissors or a blade at the base of the stem.


Brown tips

If your Cast Iron Plant has brown tips, it’s possible your plant is underwatered. While the Cast Iron is a very resilient plant, like any other greenery it will show distress if neglected for long periods of time. If you do not suspect underwatering, consider the possibility of mineral accumulation. Some areas have tap water that is too high in minerals for watering indoor plants. If this is possibly the case, try leaving a full watering can out overnight before watering your plants.

Spider mites on plants

Speckled discolored leaves

Cast Iron Plants can sometimes be susceptible to spider mites. Check the underside of the leaves to see any webbing. The spider mites themselves can be hard to see but if you shake a leaf over a sheet of paper and see small specks fall, your plant has spider mites. Don’t worry! The plant can still be saved. Follow our simple instructions for how to treat spider mites here.

 

How to maintain a beautiful and healthy Cast Iron Plant

Take care of your Cast Iron and it will take care of you! Below are simple tips to continue caring for your Cast Iron Plant over time.

How to repot Cast Iron Plant
  • Pruning - Remove dry or dead leaves all year round, but save any major pruning for the spring and summer months. When pruning your Cast Iron, use sharp, clean shears and cut any excessive growth or unwanted foliage at the base of the stem.

  • Cleaning - Take each leaf between two soft tissue cloths and wipe off the top to reveal a healthy shine. Do this at least once a month to keep away pests and help the plant soak in more light!

  • Repotting - Houseplants grow much slower than they would in the wild. Because of their slow-growing nature, Cast Iron Plants only need repotting once every three to four years.

    • When to repot - Cast Iron Plants have strong roots and will show you when it’s time! When the plant begins to “bust” out of its pot, it’s time for a new home.

    • Pot sizing - if you want your plant to grow wider, find a nursery pot that’s 2” in diameter larger than the current pot. If you want your plant to stay the same height, you can reuse the same pot and simply change the soil.

    • Get your hands dirty - spread out newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot and shake off as much of the old soil as possible so that you have clean roots. Place the plant in the center of the pot, add new soil and pat down firmly. Water the soil thoroughly and place the plant in an area with bright indirect light. Your plant will take 2-4 weeks to settle from the shock and adjust to its new home.

 

How to propagate a Cast Iron Plant

Cast Irons are easy to propagate through division. Follow these instructions to propagate your Cast Iron Plant.

  • Remove from pot - Remove a mature Cast Iron from its pot (or do this when you are repotting).

  • Separate the roots - With your hands, gently separate a root cluster (rhizome) for propagation. You will need at least two or three stems growing off the root cluster you choose to propagate.

  • Place in soil - Place in a small pot with a few inches of fresh potting soil and cover with more soil to about half an inch below the rim of the pot, firmly pressing down once you’ve reached the top.

  • Keep moist - Water frequently to keep the soil just moist to the touch. After a few weeks, your plant will take root and should feel snuggly “rooted” to its pot.

Illustrations by our talented plant stylist, Kailie Barnes.


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Indoor plants, potted & delivered

Premium plants paired with stylish pots. Order online at leonandgeorge.com

Fall Plant Care: Five Tips to Successfully Transition Your Plants For Fall
Fall plant care tips

Fall is here and along with it are shorter days, cooler temperatures, and, in some cases, a whole lot less sun.

Though houseplants generally live indoors, they, too, note the changing of the seasons. Take note of these simple fall plant care tips and set your indoor greenery up for success.

Adjust your watering schedule (hint: water less frequently!)

Less light and cooler temperatures mean that your plant may not ned as much water as it did during the summer. Make sure to always check the soil before watering and, if necessary, give your indoor plant a few extra days in between waterings to dry out.

Make sure your plant is getting enough light

As the days get shorter and shorter, make sure your plant is getting enough light: plants that sometimes do well in one area of your home may not be as happy as they were before. Signs that your plant is not getting enough light may include pale or yellowing leaves, leggy branches, or leaning towards the light. If you suspect your plant needs more light, you may either decide to move it closer to a light source for the fall and winter, or rotate it every few weeks to ensure the entire plant gets enough sunlight.

Take a break from fertilizing

The best time to fertilize your plant is when it’s actively growing in the spring and summer. Many indoor plants grow much slower in the winter, which means it’s best to hold off on the fertilizer until the spring.

Up the humidity

Much like strong air conditioning can dry out our plants in the summer, heaters of all types can have the same effect on our plants in the fall and winter. To combat dry atmospheres, mist your plant here and there (daily is great, but once or twice a week works too!).

Beware of chilly windowpanes

Windows can become very cold in the winter — make sure your plant’s foliage is not touching or too close to icy windowpanes, as this can cause distress in your plant, leading to black leaves or shock.

Good luck, plant parent! And head back to our blog for more simple plant care tips for your indoor greenery.

 
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Introducing the Scandinavian Ceramics Collection
Scandinavian ceramic design: now available with our plant & pot sets shipping nationwide!

Scandinavian ceramics have arrived.

What’s clean, airy, minimal… and cozy? Say hello to Scandinavian ceramic design, the newest collection of sleek modern planters for your indoor greenery.

What is Scandinavian design?

Scandinavian Design is a design movement that emerged in the 1950s and flourished throughout the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Sweden, & Norway) around the same time mid-century modern styles were taking hold in the United States.

It’s all in the details: Scandinavian ceramic design is all about form + function.

Marked by simplicity, minimalism, and functionality, Scandinavian design brings to mind bright, airy spaces, muted tones and textures, and natural elements like stone and wood. Other features include furniture pieces with simple and clean lines, the use of white negative space, and, inspired by a deep appreciation for nature, plenty of indoor greenery.

Scandinavian ceramic design for your indoor plants

Given Scandinavian design is so deeply inspired by natural beauty, it is no surprise that this style of ceramic so wonderfully complements indoor plants. Simple, clean lines and soft, neutral colors bring out the best in the foliage of our favorite houseplants, making bright tones pop and deeper shades glow. And when it comes to Scandinavian design, form never compromises function: 100% waterproof and complete with a deep overflow saucer, they are designed for optimal health of your indoor plants.

Shop our Scandinavian ceramic design with free shipping nationwide!

Available in white or gray, to pair with any plant from our collection of medium plant & pot sets. Order online for free nationwide shipping, and bring home a piece of Scandinavian design that will inspire tranquility, upgrade your style, and above all, last a lifetime.

Remember that all Léon & George plants come with care instructions, lifetime plant doctor support, and of course — a lot of love! Learn more about who we are, and order online today!

Decorating a Small Living Room with Plants
Decorating small living rooms with plants. Photo courtesy of  Artifact Homes .

Decorating a small living room can be a real challenge.

From tight corners to limited lay-out options, every inch counts when it comes to small spaces. And unfortunately for many a city-dweller, more often than not we are dealing with less space than we’d hope for!

Luckily there are loads of resources to navigate decorating a small living room (thanks, Pinterest!), and just because you have limited space does not mean you can’t enjoy the beauty and benefits of indoor plants! Below are our plant stylist’s favorite picks for plants that work well for small living rooms, plus extra tips for making the most of them.

Go for height

And avoid bushiness, especially if you are looking at floor plants. If all goes well (and we hope it does!), your indoor plants will grow. Make sure you are prepared for that by opting for plants that remain relatively contained to the width of their pots — both you and your plant will appreciate the extra space.

Pro tip: The Snake Plant is one of the best indoor plants for tight spaces with its narrow, structural shape. And don’t be fooled by the word “bush” in its name — the Fiddle Leaf Fig Bush is also a great indoor plant that maintains its shape over time thanks to the support of discrete bamboo stakes that keep the plant centered and erect.

Decorating small living rooms with plants

Create Groupings

Want a touch of jungle but afraid you don’t have the space? Much like you would designate a corner to a chair or other piece of furniture, create a small corner for a grouping of plants. This can have a big impact without making your space feel cluttered or claustrophobic. Start with something on the taller side, and then layer around it with smaller plants of differing foliage and shades of green. Use plant stands to elevate, always work in odd numbers (trust us — it works!), and tastefully create the perfect plant grouping.

Pro Tip: Just three plants is enough to make a simple yet eye-catching plant grouping. One of our favorite combinations is a Fiddle Leaf Fig, a Snake Plant, and a Jade Pothos — the perfect combination of varying colors and textures!

Make use of trailing foliage

If you’re decorating a small living room, odds are you’ve scoped out different shelving solutions. Make space on your shelves for a trailing plant like the Cascading Pothos — this plant grows very quickly and, if desired, will green up an entire shelving unit over time! You can place the growing vines around different areas of the shelf, or simply let it drape down from the shelf or a hanging planter.

Pro Tip: Want to decorate a wall with greenery? Use pins to prop up tendrils of a trailing plant against the wall.

Decorating a small living room with plants. Photo courtesy of  Batch .

Embrace the statement plant

Sometimes all it takes is one piece of furniture to really transform a space, and in this case, we’re talking about a potted plant. One of the biggest challenges of decorating a small living room is the fine line between cozy and cluttered, and one way to avoid this is by investing in fewer but bigger pieces. Just one large statement plant can truly pull a room together, and also give off the illusion the space is bigger, too.

Pro Tip: If you have the light (they need a lot!), consider a tall, structural beauty like the Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree. For dimmer spaces, the Dragon Tree is a true head-turner that also functions as a wonderful air-purifier.

 
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How to Repot Your Plant
How to repot your plant: a step-by-step guide!

Thinking of repotting your plant?

Repotting houseplants may seem like a scary endeavor if you’ve never gotten your hands dirty, but anyone who has ever repotted will agree that it’s not only simple but also quite fun and enjoyable as well! Learn when to repot, and how, with this simple guide.

Do you have to repot your plant?

Our Plant Doctors receive many enquiries about when to repot plants, or if it’s an absolute must for the plant to thrive. The truth is that most indoor plants only need repotting once every one or two years (though some slow growers can survive many years in the same pot!), and even then, it isn’t necessarily required to repot them in a bigger container.

The primary reason why we repot plants is to give them fresh, nutrient-rich soil, which can easily be done by removing the plant from its pot and shaking the old dirt off the roots. At that point, if you’d like your plant to stay the same size, you may simply repot it directly in the old pot, of course with fresh new soil. If you’d like your plant to grow bigger, you can repot it in something about two inches larger than what it was in before.

Of course depending on the plant, it could potentially survive years without repotting. But if you want your plant to thrive, think about giving it some fresh soil every few years!

When to repot your plant

As mentioned above, it’s good practice with indoor plants to repot once every one or two years. However, sometimes your plant may also send you signals that it’s time to repot. Here are some signs you may look for:

  • Matted roots on the soil surface, as can be common with Fiddle Leaf Figs

  • The roots are coming out at the bottom, through the drainage holes for example, not uncommon with Birds of Paradise

  • The roots are seemingly “busting” at the seams, as sometimes seen on the Snake Plant or Zanzibar Gem (and if the plant is in a plastic nursery pot, it may well break it!)

  • The roots are quite literally “pushing” the plant out of the pot

  • The plant dries out very quickly, for example in a matter of days

The best time of year to repot your plant is in the spring or summer, as this is when plants are actively growing. That said, is not the end of the world if for whatever reason you need to repot in the middle of winter!

How to repot your plant

Before repotting your plant, make sure you have the necessary materials to repot:

  • Fresh, indoor potting soil

  • If desired, a new bigger pot

  • Sharp, clean shears

When your plant is dry, or before it's next watering, follow these simple instructions:

  1. Remove the plant from its pot. For smaller plants, you can do this by simply turning over the pot and letting the plant slide out. For larger plants, you may need to lift it out while holding the pot to the floor (pro tip: spread newspaper over the floor for easy clean up!). If your plant is difficult to remove from the pot (the roots are twisting out the drainage holes), you may need to simply cut these roots off to get it out.

  2. Shake the soil off the roots, removing about half of the old soil. You may need to gently detangle some of the roots to do this. Don’t panic if some of them rip or break. You may also prune some roots, especially if you are planning on potting it in the same pot as before.

  3. Pour a couple inches of fresh potting soil into the pot and pat down so it’s firm.

  4. Place the plant in the pot and fill with more soil until it’s secure in place and standing straight. Pat down again until firm.

  5. Fill with soil to the top of the pot, but make sure to leave about an inch so that water does not overflow when you water your plant.

  6. Water thoroughly and let the plant completely drain.

Voilà! You’re done. Remember that your plant may be a little unstable the first few weeks in its new pot, so take care when moving it back to its home.


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Treating Scale (And Other Tough Leaf Dwelling Bugs)
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The latest in plant care tips for keeping your foliage happy and healthy, brought to you by premium plant delivery service Léon & George.

We're advocates for all organic everything - even when it comes to pest control. Unfortunately, sometimes Neem Oil just doesn't cut it. Especially when it comes to Scale. Not sure what Scale is? Let us explain...

Scale insects are small, hard-shelled bugs that appear on leaves and stems and suck out vital nutrients from your plants (yeah, kinda gross). This can cause your plants to lose color, vigor, and in extreme cases, death.

So you've drenched every leaf in Neem Oil but they just won't go away? What next? Rubbing Alcohol.

  • Dab a Q-tip in rubbing alcohol and pick off the scale bugs one by one.

  • Moisten a paper towel or cotton ball and thoroughly wipe down the more infested areas

  • Continue to use Neem Oil at the base of the plant to control Scale growth in the soil.

  • Repeat this once a week for 3-5 weeks, or until you're no longer finding scale on the leaves.

Recovery will take some time, but be optimistic - indoor plants can be surprisingly resilient. Once you've controlled the issue, your plant will thank you with color and life springing back into their foliage!


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BIRD OF PARADISE

A popular indoor plant for creating that instant jungle atmosphere.

3-4ft tall plant with ceramic pot

Large Indoor Plants: Now Shipping Nationwide!
Large indoor plants online: order online and we’ll deliver!

Large indoor plants online: it’s a thing!

You asked and we answered. A curated selection of our large indoor plants is now available to order online for delivery nationwide!

Gone are the days of lugging home cumbersome plants and heavy ceramic pots. Order online and get the full set — a beautiful (and clean!) indoor floor plant paired with a stylish designer ceramic of your choice — delivered straight to your door and ready to love.

Wondering which plants we’re launching with? Check out some of our best-sellers that can now ship nationwide:

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Fiddle Leaf Fig Bush

Our best-seller, a structural beauty with large violin-shaped leaves.

 
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Monstera Deliciosa

Stylish and unique, and straight out of the Art Deco era.

 
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Cast Iron Plant

Low-light, low-maintenance, ultra-lush.

 
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Snake Plant

An air-purifying plant that’s as easy to care for as it is to love.

 
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Zanzibar Gem

A gorgeous plant that’s perfect for beginners.


Remember that all Léon & George plants come with care instructions, lifetime plant doctor support, and of course — a lot of love! Learn more about who we are, and order online today!